Tag: Windows

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Windows 10 SleepStudy Report

Troubleshoot Windows 10 Battery Life and Modern Standby

More and more mobile devices are out there and Windows 10 has some need features like Modern Standby, formerly known as InstantGo or Connected Standby, which provides an instant on/instant off user experience that users expect to have with their phones. Now that said there are always scenarios where battery life or standby doesn’t work as we wish. This blog post should help to troubleshoot battery life and standby on Windows 10, using inbox tools.

Check hardware support for standby modes

Powercfg information

First of all you can check with power states, standby modes or the available sleep states supported by your hardware using the following command:

General Battery life and standby issues

In some case you can run in some issues where you have your battery draining more than expected during the Modern Standby time. This could be of the following reasons:

  • Drivers – Make sure you have the latest drivers installed
  • Firmware – Make sure you have the latest Firmware (BIOS) installed
  • Mails –  The Windows communication app keeps the broker infrastructure (BI) system active. BI, in turn, keeps the WLAN network up so that the system stays up-to-date with emails. If you get a lot of emails this can end up in a higher power drain.
  • Software –  Some installed legacy Software which does not let you go into the InstantGo modus.
  • VPN Clients – Some older VPN Clients can also cause issues with InstantGo
  • Network Activity – The WLAN device might have a challenging radio environment and the Windows system might not be able to establish a reliable Internet connection. We see how these events affect the WLAN device, which, in turn, impacts the battery.


Windows Users with PowerShell

Manage Local Windows User with PowerShell

Awhile ago Microsoft added a new PowerShell module to manage local Windows user accounts. This post should quickly show you how easily you can for example use PowerShell to create a new Windows User account, remove a Windows user account or modify windows users and groups with PowerShell.

List Windows User accounts with PowerShell

The most simple one is obviously to list Windows users or groups, using the PowerShell Get- commands.

List all local Windows Users:

List all local Windows Groups:

Create new Windows User account using PowerShell

There are three different account types you can add to Windows 10:

The following part describes how you can add them to your Windows system using PowerShell

To create a new Windows User account you can simply use the following command:

If you want to see that password you can also use this method, to create a new Windows User:

Create a new Windows User account connected to a Microsoft Account using PowerShell

With Windows 10 you have the opportunity to login using Microsoft Accounts, for example with outlook.com or hotmail.com email aliases. For that you can use the folloing command to create a new Windows User connected to a Microsoft Account. In this case you will not need to configure a password for the account, since this is connected to the Microsoft Account.

You can also add Azure Active Directory (Azure AD) accounts if your business is for example using Office 365. The following command adds an Azure AD account to the local Windows Users:

Remove Windows User account using PowerShell

You can also simply remove user accounts from Windows using PowerShell. The following command will delete the account:

Change password of a Windows User account using PowerShell

To change the password of a local Windows User account, you can use the Set-LocalUser cmdlet. This also has some other options as well, but one of the most common ones is to reset the password.

Rename a Windows User account using PowerShell

To rename a Windows User account with PowerShell, you can use the following command:

Add Windows User account to group using PowerShell

This command for example adds users to the Windows Administrator group:

I hope this gives you a quick overview how you can manage local Windows User accounts using PowerShell.



Windows Container Images

The New Windows Container Image

At Microsoft Build 2018, Microsoft announced a new Windows container image, next to the Windows Server Core container image and the Nano Server container image. This new Windows container image is for applications and workloads which need additional API dependencies beyond Nano Server and Windows Server Core.

With the release of the latest Windows 10 Insider Preview (Build 17704), you can now download a preview of that container image. Your container host will need to run at least on the Windows Insider build 17704.

Windows Container Image

The IT world is transforming and Microsoft can see a huge demand by customers for containers. However the container images available today, Nano Server and Windows Server Core are lightweight versions of Windows and not including some of the components of Windows. A huge scenario for containers is to put legacy applications into containers. With the new Windows container image, Microsoft is offering a new option for applications who need more components which are not included in Windows Server Core, like DirectX or proofing support.

Microsoft Windows Container Images

As of today, Microsoft offers 3 container images in preview:

ImageVersionSize
mcr.microsoft.com/nanoserver-insider10.0.17704.1000232 MB
mcr.microsoft.com/windowsservercore-insider10.0.17704.10003.38 GB
mcr.microsoft.com/windows-insider10.0.17704.10008.07 GB

Getting started with Windows Containers

First you need to have a host running Windows Insider Preview Build 17704 or higher. After that you can simply use docker to get the latest Insider container images from the Microsoft Container Registry:

You can read more about the new Windows Container image here on the Microsoft Virtualization Blog.

If you want to know more about the production Container Images for Windows, check out my blog post: Docker Container Images for Windows Server 1709 and new tagging



Create Ubuntu Hyper-V Generation 2 Virtual Machine

How to Install Ubuntu in a Hyper-V Generation 2 Virtual Machine

If you want to install Ubuntu or any other Linux inside a Hyper-V Generation 2 Virtual Machine you need to do a simple change to the VM so you can install it from ISO.  If you just create a Hyper-V Generation 2 Virtual Machine and try to start the Virtual Machine, the Virtual Machine will not boot from ISO. This is because of the Secure Boot feature which is included in Hyper-V Generation 2 Virtual Machines, and applies to all Linux operating systems running on Hyper-V.

How to Install Linux in a Hyper-V Generation 2 VM

Create a new Virtual Machine in the Hyper-V Manager

Create Ubuntu Hyper-V Generation 2 Virtual Machine

On the Hyper-V Virtual Machine Generation selection screen, choose Generation 2

Create Ubuntu Hyper-V Generation 2 VM

Attach the Ubuntu ISO Image to the virtual machine

Attach Ubuntu ISO to Hyper-V VM

After you have created the Virtual Machine using the wizard, go into the settings of the virtual machine. Switch to the Security section and choose the Microsoft UEFI Certificate Authority Secure Boot Template.

Now the Virtual Machine will boot from the Ubuntu ISO and you can install Ubuntu.



Microsoft Edge WebP Image Extensions

Windows 10 adds WebP support for Microsoft Edge

Today Microsoft released a new Windows 10 insider Preview build 17692. After updating to this build you will be able to automatically download the WebP Extension for Microsoft Edge. This means Microsoft Edge now supports the Google Image format called WebP. WebP is Google’s alternative smaller image format to that of JPEGs or PNGs.

This is still only present in the Windows 10 preview builds and it looks like it will be available in the next Windows 10 update later this year.



OpenSSH Server on Windows Server

Install OpenSSH Server on Windows Server

Back in 2017 Microsoft made OpenSSH available on Windows 10. Shorty after OpenSSH was also available for Windows Server, version 1709. This blog post should give you a simple step by step guy how you install OpenSSH Server on Windows Server. OpenSSH is available for Windows Server, version 1709 and higher. If you are running Windows Server 2016, and you want to stay in the long-term servicing branch, you will need to wait for the next Windows Server LTSC build.

Install OpenSSH Server on Windows Server

If you are running a Windows Server 1709 or higher, you can simply use PowerShell to install the OpenSSH Client and Server.

OpenSSH on Windows Server

You can use the following PowerShell commands to install the OpenSSH Server on Windows Server.

After the installation you can find the OpenSSH Server files and some more configuration options under “C:\Windows\System32\OpenSSH”

Next you need to configure the OpenSSH Server (sshd)

To enable authentication into an SSH server on Windows, you first have to generate host keys and repair the ACL on the host keys.

Configure OpenSSH Server on Windows

To configure the OpenSSH Server on Windows Server, just run the following PowerShell commands:

Now you should be able to access your Windows Server using an SSH client.

OpenSSH Server on Windows Server

Remember if you run your server in Microsoft Azure, you might also need to configure the Network Security Group to allow SSH Remoting on port 22.



Windows 10 RSAT Feature on Demand

Windows 10 RSAT Feature on Demand

Microsoft just released a new Windows 10 Insider build (Build 17682), with a lot of improvements. However, a great new feature for IT Pros is that RSAT (Remote Server Administration Tools for Windows 10) is now a feature on demand. You can now go to Windows Settings, Optional Features and select add features, where you then will see the different Remote Server Administration Tools for Windows 10.

This means IT Pros do not need to manually download the RSAT tools to upgrade. This will safe most of us a lot of time.

What is RSAT

Remote Server Administration Tools for Windows 10 lets IT administrators manage Windows Server from a remote computer running the full release version of Windows 10.

How to Install RSAT

Install Windows 10 RSAT using PowerShell

As mentioned you can use the Windows 10 Settings and add the feature using the UI, but you are also available using PowerShell.

This feature is currently only available in the Windows 10 Insider builds and is likely to be rolled out to everyone with Windows 10 1809 later this year.