How to monitor an Azure virtual machine with Azure Monitor

How to Monitor an Azure virtual machine with Azure Monitor

This week in the Azure tip video, we are going to have a look at how to monitor an Azure virtual machine (VM) with Azure Monitor. You can use Azure Monitor to collect and analyze monitoring data from Azure virtual machines to maintain their health. Virtual machines can be monitored for availability and performance with Azure Monitor like any other Azure resource, but they’re unique from other resources since you also need to monitor the guest operating and system and the workloads that run in it.

To learn more about how to monitor Azure virtual machines (VMs) with Azure Monitor, you can check out the following links:

  • Microsoft Docs: Monitoring Azure virtual machines with Azure Monitor
  • Quickstart: Monitor an Azure virtual machine with Azure Monitor

You can also check out how you can connect Windows Server machines in hybrid environments to Azure Monitor using Windows Admin Center here. If you have any questions, comments, or another great idea for an Azure tip video, feel free to leave a comment below.



Azure Stack Hub Bordonaro IT

Azure Stack Hub Partner Solutions Series – BORDONARO IT

This week, Tiberiu Radu (Azure Stack Hub PM) and I, had the chance to speak with Microsoft MVP Dino Bordonaro from Azure Stack Hub Partner BORDONARO IT. BORDONARO IT is an Azure Stack Hub partner and Preferred SI that focuses on managed services. They are lead by Dino Bordonaro, who is an Azure Stack Hub MVP, and together with his team, they are delivering value to their customers by creating hybrid solutions on Azure and Azure Stack. BORDONARO IT runs the Center of Excellence where they offer Validation as a Service and PoC environments that partners and customers can use.

We created this new Azure Stack Hub Partner solution video series to show how our customers and partners use Azure Stack Hub in their Hybrid Cloud environment.  In this series, as we will meet customers that are deploying Azure Stack Hub for their own internal departments, partners that run managed services on behalf of their customers, and a wide range of in-between as we look at how our various partners are using Azure Stack Hub to bring the power of the cloud on-premises.

Links mentioned through the video:

I hope this video was helpful and you enjoyed watching it. If you have any questions, feel free to leave a comment below. If you want to learn more about the Microsoft Azure Stack portfolio, check out my blog post.



Azure Management - Single control plane for resources everywhere using Azure Arc

Organize Azure Arc enabled Servers

In this blog post, we are going to have a look at how you can organize and manage Azure Arc enabled Servers running on-premises or at other cloud providers, using Azure as a single control plane. But before we start with that let’s first have a look at how customers are using Azure Resource Manager to manage their Azure resources today. To organize and manage Azure resources and services like virtual machines, web apps, databases, storage, and much more in Microsoft Azure, we are using Azure Resource Manager. Azure Resource Manager (ARM) is the deployment and management service for Microsoft Azure. ARM provides a management layer that enables you to create, update, and delete resources in Azure, and you can use management features, like access control, locks, and tags, to secure and organize your resources after deployment. So when we are using tools like the Azure portal, Azure PowerShell, Azure CLI, SDKs, and APIs, to manage our Azure resource we are basically interacting with Azure Resource Manager.

Azure Resource Manager Management Overview

Azure Resource Manager Management Overview (Source: Microsoft)

Azure Resource Manager provides us with the logic and scope to manage and organize Azure resources like management groups, subscriptions, resource groups, and resources.

Azure Management - Single control plane for Azure resources

Azure Management – Single control plane for Azure resources

Now many of our customers said, that ARM is a great way to manage Azure resources, but how about resources that are deployed outside of Azure, in on-premises datacenters, branch offices, factories, or even at other cloud providers? With Azure Arc, they can now onboard services like servers, Kubernetes clusters, databases, and more, and use Azure as a single control plane to manage and organize these resources. Azure Arc extends the Azure Resource Manager and Azure Management capabilities for resources outside of Azure.

Azure Management - Single control plane for resources everywhere using Azure Arc

Azure Management – Single control plane for resources everywhere using Azure Arc

You can onboard Linux and Windows Servers using the Azure Arc Center in the Azure portal. Here you can also get an overview of all your Azure Arc resources.

Azure Arc Center - Azure Portal

Azure Arc Center – Azure Portal

You can also find the Azure Arc enabled servers like any other Azure resources on the all resources page. This allows you to get an inventory of all your servers in your environment.

Inventory for Azure Arc enabled Servers and Azure VMs

Inventory for Azure Arc enabled Servers and Azure VMs

You can see that your Azure Arc enabled servers to show up as Azure resources. You can use the filter to limit the view to only Azure virtual machines (VMs), and Azure Arc enabled servers.

Filter for Azure VMs and Azure Arc Machines

Filter for Azure VMs and Azure Arc Machines

You can also use tagslocks, and RBAC (role-based access control) to organize and manage these resources. This makes it easy to for example list all your servers from a spesific department, project, or cost center.

Using Tags

Using Tags

Azure Arc is not only limited to the Azure portal, but you can also use the Azure APIs, CLI, PowerShell, and the Azure Resource Graph to manage your Azure Arc machines.

I hope this gives you a very quick overview of how you can use Azure Arc enabled Servers to get a glimpse of all your hybrid servers running on-premises, at the edge, and even at other cloud providers. If you want to learn more about Azure Arc and the management capabilities, check out my blogs about Azure Arc, like Azure Arc Enabled Servers Extension Management and many more. Also, make sure you check out the official Azure Arc enabled servers documentation on Microsoft Docs.

If you have any questions, feel free to leave a comment.



Lisa At The Edge Podcast - Thomas Maurer - Career Development & Azure Arc

Lisa At The Edge Podcast – Thomas Maurer – Career Development & Azure Arc

This week I had the honor to be on the Lisa at the Edge podcast, where I had the chance to speak with Lisa Clark, who is an EMEA Microsoft Hybrid Cloud Business Strategist at Dell Technologies. In her podcast, we talked about Azure Arc and Azure Hybrid Cloud, as well as career development. You can watch the full episode on here and on YouTube as well as on Lisa at the Edge – Hybrid Cloud & Careers in Tech.

Episode 21: Lisa At The Edge Podcast – Thomas Maurer – Career Development & Azure Arc

Thomas is a Cloud Advocate at Microsoft for Azure focused on Azure and Hybrid and former MVP. Thomas runs a very successful blog jam-packed with useful content on Azure Certification Guides, Windows Server, Azure IaaS, and more. He is a successful speaker and I was extremely lucky to have him on the podcast. In this episode, we talk about Thomas’s career path from apprentice to landing a dream role at Microsoft. We also discuss Multi-Cloud and Hybrid Cloud terminology and then get stuck into the hot topic of the moment: Azure Arc.

About the Lisa at the Edge Podcast

“On the Lisa at the Edge Podcast, you will find all kinds of interesting topics as I speak to amazing people from across the global tech community.

I started this podcast at the beginning of lockdown here in Scotland as Covid-19 took over and changed our world. Podcasting and blogging are activities I had always wanted to try but for one reason (excuse) or another, I never got started. I decided lockdown was the perfect opportunity to give it a go! It is a way for me to stay connected to the tech community and learn new skills. I haven’t ruled any topics out and I haven’t stuck to the advice of ‘find your niche’ because that’s just not me! However, there will be a heavy focus on two of my favorite topics: Careers in Tech and Microsoft Hybrid Cloud.”

Learn more about Cloud Computing and Microsoft Azure

I hope you enjoyed that episode as much as I did. If you want to learn more about Microsoft Azure and Cloud Computing, check out my blog post, in which I summarized a couple of useful links.



Azure Stack Hub Partner Solutions Series – Cloud Assert

Azure Stack Hub Partner Solutions Series – Cloud Assert

This week, Tiberiu Radu (Azure Stack Hub PM @rctibi) and I, had the chance to speak to Azure Stack Hub Partner Cloud Assert. Cloud Assert is an Azure Stack Hub partner that helps provide value to both Enterprises and Service Providers. Their solutions cover aspects from billing and approvals all the way to multi-Azure Stack Hub stamp management. Join the Cloud Assert team as we explore the many ways their solutions provide value and help Service Providers and Enterprises in their journey with Azure Stack Hub.

They have several solutions for customers and partners like Azure Stack Hub Multi-Stamp management. Azure Stack Hub Multi-Stamp management enables you to manage and take actions across multiple stamp instances from a single Azure Stack Hub portal with one-pane of glass experience. It provides a holistic way for operators and administrators to perform many of their scenarios from a single portal without switching between various stamp portals. This is a comprehensive solution from Cloud Assert leveraging Cloud Assert VConnect and Usage and billing resource providers for Azure Stack Hub.

We created this new Azure Stack Hub Partner solution video series to show how our customers and partners use Azure Stack Hub in their Hybrid Cloud environment.  In this series, as we will meet customers that are deploying Azure Stack Hub for their own internal departments, partners that run managed services on behalf of their customers, and a wide range of in-between as we look at how our various partners are using Azure Stack Hub to bring the power of the cloud on-premises.

Links mentioned through the video:

I hope this video was helpful and you enjoyed watching it. If you have any questions, feel free to leave a comment below. If you want to learn more about the Microsoft Azure Stack portfolio, check out my blog post.



Manage updates and patches for your Azure VMs

Manage updates and patches for your Azure VMs

In this week’s Azure tip video we are going to have a look at how to manage updates and patches for your Azure virtual machines (VMs). After watching this video, you’ll be able to enable Azure Update Management, deploy updates, review an update assessment, and manage updates for your Azure VMs.

You can use Update Management in Azure Automation to manage operating system updates for your Windows and Linux machines in Azure, in on-premises environments, and in other cloud environments. You can quickly assess the status of available updates on all agent machines and manage the process of installing required updates for servers. If you want to learn more, check out my blog post on how to manage updates on Azure VMs. Also, make sure you check out a new feature called Azure Automatic VM Guest OS patching. To learn more about that feature, check out my blog post: How to configure Azure Automatic VM guest OS patching

To learn more about Azure Update management for your Azure virtual machines, check out the following links:

I hope this video was help full when it comes to managing updates and patches for your Azure VMs. If you have any questions, comments, or another great idea for an Azure tip video, feel free to leave a comment below.



Connect a hybrid server to Azure using Azure Arc

Connect a Hybrid Server to Azure using Azure Arc

New week, new Azure tip video!. This week we are going to have a look at how you can connect a hybrid server to Azure using Azure Arc. Azure Arc enabled servers enables you to manage and govern your Windows and Linux machines hosted across on-premises, edge, and multi-cloud environments. You’ll learn how to deploy and configure the Connected Machine agent on your Windows or Linux machine hosted outside of Azure for management by Arc enabled servers.

You can also check out the following links to learn more about Azure Arc enabled servers and how you can connect a hybrid server to Azure using Azure Arc.

Connect a Hybrid Server to Azure using Azure Arc

To connect a server running on-premises or at another cloud provider to Azure using Azure Arc, you can simply go to the Azure Portal to the Azure Arc Center and select Azure Arc enabled servers. Here you can click on the “Add” button.

Add Azure Arc Enabled Server

Add Azure Arc Enabled Server

There are currently two different ways to onboard a server. You can use an interactive script or an adding servers at scale method. With the interactive script method, you will need to provide credentials when running the script on a machine. With the onboarding at scale method, you will need to create a Service Principal Name with the minimum set of Azure permissions to onboard your servers. I highly recommend that in production environments, you o for the service principal method.

Select a method

Select a method

For demonstration purposes, we will go on with the interactive script method because this provides you with more details when you do it the first time. You will be provided with some of the prerequisites for Azure Arc enabled servers.

Add a server with Azure Arc

Add a server with Azure Arc.

You will need to provide some resources details, such as the Azure subscription, resource group, region for the metadata. You will also need to select the operating system type since the script you will get at the end will be a PowerShell script for your Windows machines and a shell script for your Linux servers.

Resource Details

Resource Details

You can now configure tags for your Azure Arc enabled server, or you can skip that step and do that later. In the end, you will be provided with a script, which you can run on the server you want to onboard to Azure Arc. This script will download the Azure Connected Machine agent, install the agent and register the server to Microsoft Azure.

Azure Arc Onboarding Script

Azure Arc Onboarding Script

This should provide you with a quick overview of how you can add a hybrid server to Azure using Azure Arc. Now the Azure Arc enabled server will show up as an Azure resource, and you can start using Azure management services for your on-premises server, like monitoring. If you want to learn more about Azure Arc, check out the recording of my session at Experts Live – Azure Hybrid Cloud Management.

If you have any questions or comments, feel free to leave a comment below.