Tag: Visual Studio

VSCode in Azure Cloud Shell

You can now run a Visual Studio Code based editor in Azure Cloud Shell

Azure Cloud Shell, a browser-accessible shell for managing Azure resources, just got even more powerful. Today Microsoft added a new Visual Studio Code editor to Azure Cloud Shell. Okay, it is not the real Visual Studio Code, it is an editor based on the Visual Studio Code open-source project Monaco. Monaco is the same web-standards based editor that powers Visual Studio Code, and the editor is now integrated directly into Cloud Shell.

Now you not only have editors like vim, emacs or nano, you also able to run code, directly with in the Azure Cloud Shell. This is pretty handy when it comes to quickly edit some files like scripts or ARM templates.

This is not the first time the Azure Cloud Shell team and the Visual Studio Code team collaborated: Azure Cloud Shell in Visual Studio Code



My Favorite Visual Studio Code Themes

While I am doing presentations, I often do demos, and since a lot of my demos are PowerShell based, I use a lot of Visual Studio Code. With that I often get the question which is the Visual Studio Code Theme I use. Even I change my Visual Studio Code Themes pretty often, I have a couple of favorites I want to share.

Azure Contrast (rainglow)

VS Code Theme Azure Contrast rainglow

Rainglow has a huge amount for different themes, my favorite one is their Azure, Azure Contrast theme.

Cobalt2

Visual Studio Code Theme Cobalt2

My current favorite Visual Studio Code Theme is Cobalt2. Cobalt2 is a dark but colorful theme for Visual Studio. I like it because it is a dark theme, but it not uses the classic dark grey background, instead I like the mix of dark blue and yellow.

Atom One Dark

Visual Studio Code Theme Atom One Dark

Atom One Dark is another Dark theme I started to like very much. I like the popping colors on the dark background.

Ayu Mirage – Visual Studio Code Theme

Visual Studio Code Theme Ayu Mirage

The Ayu Themes for Visual Studio are simple, bright and elegant themes. I prefer the Ayu Mirage theme which as I said looks very elegant. The Ayu themes also have other options like the Ayu light which is also one of my favorites.

Dracula

Visual Studio Code Theme Dracula

Dracula is one of the famous Visual Studio Code themes, which is also available on other platforms. When I am not using the Cobalt2 theme, I most often switch to Dracula.

Ayu Light

Visual Studio Code Theme Ayu Light

I mentioned the Ayu Themes before, and this is the light version of it. I am mostly using dark themes, but when I switch to a light theme, I mostly use Ayu Light.

PowerShell ISE

Visual Studio Code Theme PowerShell ISE

If you are coming form PowerShell scripting, you are already familiar with the PowerShell ISE. The PowerShell ISE theme bring you back in to the old school world and even gives you the PowerShell blue background terminal.

There are a lot of other great Visual Studio Code Themes out there. What is your favorite? Let me know in the comments!



Azure Cloud Shell

Azure Cloud Shell – shell.azure.com and in Visual Studio Code

Back in May Microsoft made the Azure Cloud Shell available in the Microsoft Azure Portal. Now you can use it even quicker by just go to shell.azure.com. First you login with your Microsoft account or Work and School account, and if your account is in multiple Azure Active Directory tenants, you select the right tenant and you will be automatically logged in. So even if you are on a PC where you can not install the Azure CLI or the Azure PowerShell module, you can still easily fire up a shell where you can run the Azure CLI, Azure PowerShell and other CLI tools like Docker, Kubectl, emacs, vim, nano, git and more.

In addition you can also open up Azure Cloud Shell directly from Visual Studio Code

Azure Cloud Shell Visual Studio Code

With that, enjoy your holidays and I wish you a good start in the new year!



PowerShell for Visual Studio Code

PowerShell for Visual Studio Code 1.0 – Your improved PowerShell ISE

Microsoft yesterday not only announced the new Azure Cloud Shell, Azure PowerShell 4.0, they also announced something I was waiting for a long time. Microsoft finally announced the version 1 of the PowerShell for Visual Studio Code with a lot for great enhancements. David Wilson describes this on the PowerShell Team blog.

This supports the PowerShell development on the following platforms:

  • Windows 7 through 10 with PowerShell v3 and higher
  • Linux with PowerShell v6 (all PowerShell-supported distributions)
  • macOS and OS X with PowerShell v6

Features:

  • PowerShell ISE-like interactive development experience with the PowerShell Integrated Console
  • Rich debugging experience including variables view, call stack, watch window, and various breakpoint types
  • Integrated script analysis and code fixes provided by PSScriptAnalyzer
  • Code navigations that allow you to find definitions and references of functions across your script files
  • Highly configurable code formatter based on community best practices
  • New file and project creation using Plaster templates
  • Editor scripting API through the $psEditor object model

The biggest thing about this for me, is the support to run code line by line, which will help a lot in demos and presentations.

So what does this mean for the PowerShell ISE?

The PowerShell ISE has been the official editor for PowerShell throughout most of the history of Windows PowerShell. Now with the advent of the cross-platform PowerShell Core, we need a new official editor that’s available across all supported OS platforms and versions. Visual Studio Code is now that editor and the majority of our effort will be focused there.
However, the PowerShell ISE will remain in Windows supporting Windows PowerShell with no plans to remove it. We will consider investing effort there in the future if there is a high demand for it, but for now we think that we will be able to provide the best possible experience to the PowerShell community through Visual Studio Code.

Really looking forward to work with PowerShell for Visual Studio Code.



Microsoft WebMatrix and Microsoft WebPlatform Installer

Microsoft WebMatrixFor a project at KTSI we needed a platform to quick deploy PHP and MySQL applications. There are a lot of solutions out there in the web, for example XAMPP. After testing some options I had a closer look at the Microsoft WebPlatform Installer and Microsoft WebMatrix. Those two tools do exactly what I need. With the WebPlatform Installer you can easily install a local instance of IIS Express with ASP.NET, PHP, MSSQL and MySQL support with in 5-10 minutes.

But the coolest tool in my opinion is WebMatrix. Webmatrix lets developers create, manage and deploy Web Applications very very easy. And if you need to to more Webmatrix lets you also work with Visual Studio on the same project.



Visual Studio 2010 Service Pack 1

Today Microsoft released Service Pack 1 for Visual Studio. You can download the Update from MSDN.

Microsoft Visual Studio 2010 SP1

There is also an update for the PowerGUI Extension for Visual Studio 2010. You can get this from Codeplex or in Visual Studio in the Extension Manager.

PowerGUI VSX 1.3.3

 



PowerShell Integration Into Visual Studio

The PowerGUI Visual Studio Extension adds PowerShell
IntelliSense support to Visual Studio. This is nothing new but Adam Driscoll just released a new version 1.3 for PowerGUI 2.4. If you work a lot with Powershell and if you do small bigger Powershell projects this will help you a lot.

New Features

  • PowerGUI Console Tool Window
  • PowerShell Project Type

Current Features

  • IntelliSense support through a custom PowerShell editor
  • Syntax highlighting and script analysis
  • Supports PowerGUI settings
  • Supports PowerGUI imported modules
  • Supports PowerGUI Snippets
  • PowerShell debugging
  • PowerGUI Console Tool Window
  • PowerShell Project Type