Tag: Ubuntu

Windows Terminal Color Schemes -Themes

My Windows Terminal Color Schemes

The Windows Terminal became generally available at the Microsoft Build 2020 virtual conference a couple of weeks ago. I already blogged about how you can customize your Windows Terminal settings and shared my settings.json file. Many people asked me about the different Windows Terminal Color Schemes I use. So I thought a blog post would be a good way of sharing my Windows Terminal Schemes.

Windows Terminal 1.0 was released on May 19, you can find more documentation here on Microsoft Docs.

I already shared a couple of blog posts on how you can customize your Windows Terminal experience:

My Windows Terminal Color Schemes

Here is my Windows Terminal Color Schemes. Since I use the acrylic effect, I post a picture when the Windows Terminal window is active and one where it is inactive.

Vibrant Tom

Vibrant Tom

Vibrant Tom

Vibrant Tom Inactive

Vibrant Tom Inactive

This one I use for my default shell (PowerShell 7).

{
            // Color Scheme: VibrantTom
            "background" : "#16171D",
            "black" : "#878787",
            "blue" : "#44B4CC",
            "brightBlack" : "#E373C8",
            "brightBlue" : "#0000FF",
            "brightCyan" : "#19D1D8",
            "brightGreen" : "#81EC0D",
            "brightPurple" : "#FF00FF",
            "brightRed" : "#FF0000",
            "brightWhite" : "#E5E5E5",
            "brightYellow" : "#FFD93D",
            "cyan" : "#19D1D8",
            "foreground" : "#FFFFFF",
            "green" : "#CCFF04",
            "name" : "VibrantTom",
            "purple" : "#9933CC",
            "red" : "#FF6600",
            "white" : "#F5F5F5",
            "yellow" : "#FFD93D"
        },

Windows PowerShell Tom

Windows PowerShell Tom

Windows PowerShell Tom

Windows PowerShell Tom Inactive

Windows PowerShell Tom Inactive

{
            // Color Scheme: PowerShellTom
            "background" : "#012456",
            "black" : "#000000",
            "blue" : "#0000ff",
            "brightBlack" : "#AAAAAA",
            "brightBlue" : "#44B4CC",
            "brightCyan" : "#19D1D8",
            "brightGreen" : "#81EC0D",
            "brightPurple" : "#FF00FF",
            "brightRed" : "#FF0000",
            "brightWhite" : "#E5E5E5",
            "brightYellow" : "#FFD93D",
            "cyan" : "#19D1D8",
            "foreground" : "#FFFFFF",
            "green" : "#00ff00",
            "name" : "PowerShellTom",
            "purple" : "#9933CC",
            "red" : "#FF6600",
            "white" : "#F5F5F5",
            "yellow" : "#FFD93D"
        },

Retro Command Prompt

Retro Command Prompt

Retro Command Prompt

Dracula

Dracula

Dracula

Dracula Inactive

Dracula Inactive

{
            // Color Scheme: Dracula
            "background" : "#282A36",
            "black" : "#21222C",
            "blue" : "#BD93F9",
            "brightBlack" : "#6272A4",
            "brightBlue" : "#D6ACFF",
            "brightCyan" : "#A4FFFF",
            "brightGreen" : "#69FF94",
            "brightPurple" : "#FF92DF",
            "brightRed" : "#FF6E6E",
            "brightWhite" : "#FFFFFF",
            "brightYellow" : "#FFFFA5",
            "cyan" : "#8BE9FD",
            "foreground" : "#F8F8F2",
            "green" : "#50FA7B",
            "name" : "Dracula",
            "purple" : "#FF79C6",
            "red" : "#FF5555",
            "white" : "#F8F8F2",
            "yellow" : "#F1FA8C"
        },

Ubuntu Legit

UbuntuLegit

UbuntuLegit

UbuntuLegit Inactive

UbuntuLegit Inactive

This one I saw first at Scott Hanselman’s blog. This one I use for my Windows Subsystem for Linux 2 (WSL 2) running Ubuntu.

{
            // Color Scheme: UbuntuLegit
            "background":  "#2C001E",
            "black":  "#4E9A06",
            "blue":  "#3465A4",
            "brightBlack":  "#555753",
            "brightBlue":  "#729FCF",
            "brightCyan":  "#34E2E2",
            "brightGreen":  "#8AE234",
            "brightPurple":  "#AD7FA8",
            "brightRed":  "#EF2929",
            "brightWhite":  "#EEEEEE",
            "brightYellow":  "#FCE94F",
            "cyan":  "#06989A",
            "foreground":  "#EEEEEE",
            "green":  "#300A24",
            "name":  "UbuntuLegit",
            "purple":  "#75507B",
            "red":  "#CC0000",
            "white":  "#D3D7CF",
            "yellow":  "#C4A000"
        },

Vibrant Tom Light

Vibrant Tom Light

Vibrant Tom Light

Vibrant Tom Light Inactive

Vibrant Tom Light Inactive

This one I am still working on. I am not 100 percent happy, so let me know if you have any ideas.

{
            // Color Scheme: VibrantInkTom Light
            "background" : "#EEEEEE",
            "black" : "#878787",
            "blue" : "#44B4CC",
            "brightBlack" : "#595e68",
            "brightBlue" : "#0000FF",
            "brightCyan" : "#19D1D8",
            "brightGreen" : "#3f953a",
            "brightPurple" : "#FF00FF",
            "brightRed" : "#FF0000",
            "brightWhite" : "#E5E5E5",
            "brightYellow" : "#FF6600",
            "cyan" : "#44B4CC",
            "foreground" : "#16171D",
            "green" : "#3f953a",
            "name" : "VibrantTomLight",
            "purple" : "#9933CC",
            "red" : "#FF6600",
            "white" : "#F5F5F5",
            "yellow" : "#FFD93D"
        },

Conclusion

I hope this blog post helps you to customize your Windows Terminal and I hope you like my Windows Terminal color schemes. Let me know in the comments which Windows Terminal Theme you like best.



Surface Pro X Windows 10 on ARM WSL 2

How to Install WSL 2 on Windows 10 on ARM

This is just a quick blog post about the experience on running the Windows Subsystem for Linux 2 (WSL 2) on Windows 10 on ARM, which comes on devices like the Surface Pro X. Since I got many questions from developers and IT Pros about the Surface Pro X and how it can handle different workflows on Windows 10 on ARM, I decided to write a blog post, on how you can install WSL 2 on Windows 10 on ARM and the Surface Pro X.

Requirements

You need a device that runs Windows 10 on ARM like the Surface Pro X. Yes, WSL 2 works on the Surface Pro X, and you can run Ubuntu 18.04, which comes as an ARM compiled distro. But you will need to install at Windows Insider build (19041 or higher, also known as Windows 10 20H1 or Windows 10 version 2004). And yes, if you are running an Intel or AMD based machine, you can also install and run WSL 2 on Windows 10.

Install Windows 10 on ARM Windows Insider Build

Install Windows 10 on ARM Windows Insider Build

To run Windows 10 Insider Builds, you can go to Settings, Update & Security, and the Windows Insider Program and join the program. If you get asked to choose the Ring, you will need to select the Insider Slow Ring. You will need to reboot your machine and check for updates, to install the Windows Insider builds.

Install WSL 2 on Windows 10 on ARM

To install the Windows Subsystem for Linux 2 (WSL 2), you need to follow these tasks.

  • Enable the Windows Subsystem for Linux Optional feature (WSL 1 and WSL 2)
  • Install a distro for the Windows Subsystem for Linux
  • Enable the ‘Virtual Machine Platform’ optional feature (WSL 2)
  • Configure the distro to use WSL 2

Enable the Windows Subsystem for Linux and Virtual Machine Platform

Windows 10 on ARM Control Panel WSL2

Windows 10 on ARM Control Panel WSL2

You can enable the Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL) and the Virtual Machine Platform feature in the Control Panel or with PowerShell.

Enable-WindowsOptionalFeature -Online -FeatureName Microsoft-Windows-Subsystem-Linux
 
Enable-WindowsOptionalFeature -Online -FeatureName VirtualMachinePlatform

These commands will need a reboot of the machine.

Install a Linux distro for the Windows Subsystem for Linux

If you don’t already have installed a WSL distro, you can download and install it from the Windows 10 store. You can find more here: Crazy times – You can now run Linux on Windows 10 from the Windows Store.

Install Ubuntu ARM WSL 2 Windows Store on the Surface Pro X

Install Ubuntu ARM WSL 2 Windows Store on the Surface Pro X

If you want to run a full Ubuntu virtual machine on Windows 10 Hyper-V, you can check out my blog post.

Set WSL distro to use version 2

After you completed the first two steps, you will need to configure the distro to use WSL 2. Run the following command to list the available distros in PowerShell:

wsl -l -v

If this command doesn’t work with the -v parameter, you don’t have the right Windows 10 build installed.

To set a distro to WSL 2, you can run the following command:

wsl --set-version DistroName 2
Convert to WSL 2

Convert to WSL 2

You can also set WSL 2 as the default. You can also run the command before you start the Linux distro for the first time, which will give you faster setup speeds.

wsl --set-default-version 2

To find out more about installing WSL 2, check out the Microsoft Docs page.

After you have enabled WSL 2 you can see that WSL 1 was running kernel version 4.4.0.

WSL 1 Kernel Version

WSL 1 Kernel Version

 

WSL 2 is running Linux kernel version 4.19.84

WSL 2 Kernel Version

WSL 2 Kernel Version

You can also see, that this is an ARM version of Ubuntu.

Ubuntu ARM

Ubuntu ARM

Conclusion

I hope this helps you and gives you a quick overview on how you can install WSL 2 on Windows 10 on ARM and the Surface Pro X. If you have any questions, let me know in the comments and check out the WSL 2 FAQ. The Windows Subsystem for Linux 2 Kernel is also open-source, you can follow the project on GitHub.

By the way, you can now also start using Docker Desktop together with the Windows Subsystem for Linux 2 and even use WSL 2 on Windows Server.



Ubuntu VM on Windows 10

How to create an Ubuntu VM on Windows 10

Windows 10 is not just a modern desktop operating system, and it also has some great IT Pro and Developer related features build in. One of them is client Hyper-V. This is the same hypervisor which powers virtualization in Windows Server and the Microsoft Azure datacenters. With Hyper-V, you can create virtual machines running on Windows 10, without the need for third-party software. You can not just run Windows virtual machines, and you can also run Linux virtual machines. In this blog post, I am going to show you how you can create an Ubuntu VM on Windows 10 using Hyper-V.

If you want to know more about Hyper-V on Windows 10, check out the Microsoft Docs.

Install Hyper-V

First, you will need to install Hyper-V on your Windows 10 computer. Hyper-V on Windows 10 has the following requirements:

  • Windows 10 Enterprise, Professional, or Education (Home does not have the Hyper-V feature included)
  • 64-bit Processor with Second Level Address Translation (SLAT)
  • CPU support for VM Monitor Mode Extension (VT-c on Intel CPU’s)
  • Minimum of 4 GB memory

The easiest way to enable Hyper-V on Windows 10 is to run the following PowerShell command as an administrator:

Enable-WindowsOptionalFeature -Online -FeatureName:Microsoft-Hyper-V -All

After you have installed Hyper-V, you need to restart your computer.

Create an Ubuntu virtual machine on Windows 10

To create an Ubuntu virtual machine on Windows 10 Hyper-V, you could download the Ubuntu ISO file and install it like any operating system. However, there is a much easier way, using the Hyper-V Quick Create feature. In the Hyper-V VM Gallery, you will find not just two Windows 10 virtual machines; you will also currently find Ubuntu 18.04 LTS and Ubuntu 19.04. These are prepared Hyper-V virtual machines images, ready for you to download and install.

Ubuntu Hyper-V VM Images

Select the Ubuntu version you want to install and click on Create Virtual Machine. This will start downloading the virtual machine image.

Downloading Ubuntu Hyper-V VM Image

After the image is downloaded, you can either connect to the virtual machine and start it, or you can first modify the virtual machine settings.

Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Hyper-V VM

Optional: If you click on Edit settings, you will be able to configure the virtual machine hardware settings like vCPU or vRAM. You can also enable Secure Boot. If you enable Secure Boot for a Linux virtual machine, make sure you change the Secure Boot template to Microsoft UEFI Certificate Authority.

Ubuntu Hyper-V UEFI Secure Boot Settings

You can now start the Ubuntu VM.

Start Ubuntu hyper-V VM

 

This will boot you in the Ubuntu installation, where you can set up your Ubuntu operating system.

Install Ubuntu VM

All the specific Hyper-V drivers for Ubuntu, are already included in the image. This allows you to use features like Hyper-V Enhanced Session Mode, which enables you also to use copy-paste, and others.

Ubuntu VM on Windows 10

I hope this gives you a step-by-step guide, how you can create an Ubuntu VM on Windows 10 using Hyper-V. If you have any questions, please let me know in the comments.



Azure Confidential Compute VM Deployment

Protect Workloads with Azure Confidential Computing

A year ago Microsoft announced that they were working on a new technology in Azure to protect and encrypt data in use, called Azure Confidential Computing. If you are moving sensitive data to the cloud, you also want to encrypt it. Today, you can do this for data in transit and data at rest. However, data in use is a challenge. Azure Confidential Computing addresses precisely that scenario and helps you to encrypt data in use. Microsoft was running a private preview program in the last year, and at Microsoft Ignite this year, Microsoft opened up a public preview.

What is Azure Confidential Computing

Azure Confidential Computing together with Intel SGX technology, addresses the following threads:

  • Malicious insiders with administrative privilege or direct access to hardware on which it is being processed
  • Hackers and malware that exploit bugs in the operating system, application, or hypervisor
  • Third parties accessing it without their consent

There are ways to secure data at rest and in transit, but you need to protect your data from threats as it’s being processed. Now you can. Confidential computing adds new data security capabilities using trusted execution environments (TEEs) or encryption mechanisms to protect your data while in use. TEEs are hardware or software implementations that safeguard data being processed from access outside the TEE. The hardware provides a protected container by securing a portion of the processor and memory. Only authorized code is permitted to run and to access data, so code and data are protected against viewing and modification from outside of TEE.



Create Ubuntu Hyper-V Generation 2 Virtual Machine

How to Install Ubuntu in a Hyper-V Generation 2 Virtual Machine

If you want to install Ubuntu or any other Linux inside a Hyper-V Generation 2 Virtual Machine you need to do a simple change to the VM so you can install it from ISO.  If you create a Hyper-V Generation 2 Virtual Machine and try to start the Virtual Machine, the Virtual Machine will not boot from ISO. This is because of the Secure Boot feature, which is included in Hyper-V Generation 2 Virtual Machines and applies to all Linux operating systems running on Hyper-V.

If you don’t want to install the Ubuntu manually, you can simply use the Ubuntu images from the Hyper-V Quick Create gallery. This has all the necessary tools already installed.

Ubuntu Hyper-V VM Images

Ubuntu Hyper-V VM Images

How to Install Linux in a Hyper-V Generation 2 VM

Create a new Virtual Machine in the Hyper-V Manager

Create Ubuntu Hyper-V Generation 2 Virtual Machine

On the Hyper-V Virtual Machine Generation selection screen, choose Generation 2

Create Ubuntu Hyper-V Generation 2 VM

Attach the Ubuntu ISO Image to the virtual machine

Attach Ubuntu ISO to Hyper-V VM

After you have created the Virtual Machine using the wizard, go into the settings of the virtual machine. Switch to the Security section and choose the Microsoft UEFI Certificate Authority Secure Boot Template.

Now the Virtual Machine will boot from the Ubuntu ISO, and you can install Ubuntu.

On long-term support (LTS) releases use the latest virtual Hardware Enablement (HWE) kernel for up-to-date Linux Integration Services. To install the Azure-tuned kernel on 16.04, 18.04, and 20.04, run the following commands as root (or sudo):

apt-get update
apt-get install linux-azure

I hope this helps, if you have any questions feel free to leave a comment below.



Ubuntu on Windows Server using WSL

Install Windows Subsystem for Linux on Windows Server

In 2017 Microsoft made it possible to run different Linux distribution on Windows 10, using a feature called the “Windows Subsystem for Linux“. With the latest official Semi-Annual Channel Windows Server release called Windows Server, version 1709 Microsoft also allowed to run the Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL) on Windows Server. With the next release of Windows Server called Windows Server, version 1803, Microsoft will also add some improvements to the Windows Subsystem on Linux, which also apply to Windows 10 as well as Windows Server. This blog post shows you how you can do this.

First, you have a Windows Server, version 1709 running. After that enable the Microsoft Windows Subsystem for Linux feature, running the following command (This will need a reboot)

Enable-WindowsOptionalFeature -Online -FeatureName Microsoft-Windows-Subsystem-Linux

You can download the appx packages for your favorite Linux distribution; this can be today:

  • Ubuntu
  • OpenSUSE
  • Suse Linux Enterprise Server

If you are running on Windows Server Core (which is highly likely), you can use the following command to download the Linux distributions.

# For Ubuntu 16.04
 
Invoke-WebRequest -Uri https://aka.ms/wsl-ubuntu-1604 -OutFile ~/Ubuntu.zip -UseBasicParsing
 
# For Ubuntu 18.04
 
Invoke-WebRequest -Uri https://aka.ms/wsl-ubuntu-1804 -OutFile ~/Ubuntu1804.zip -UseBasicParsing
 
# For OpenSUSE 42
 
Invoke-WebRequest -Uri https://aka.ms/wsl-opensuse-42 -OutFile ~/OpenSUSE.zip -UseBasicParsing
 
# For SLES 12
 
Invoke-WebRequest -Uri https://aka.ms/wsl-sles-12 -OutFile ~/SLES.zip -UseBasicParsing

You can then unpack the file:

Expand-Archive ~/Ubuntu.zip C:\Distros\Ubuntu

Now you can open that folder and run the installer, for example ubuntu.exe. The first time this will do the setup where you also define the UNIX username and password as well as the root password.

WSL on Windows Server

After that, you can run updates for your distro, and you can start using Linux.

If you want to know more about the WSL, check out the Microsoft Documentation: Windows Subsystem for Linux Documentation and have a look at my WSL post in for Windows 10: Crazy times – You can now run Linux on Windows 10 from the Windows Store

You can also find the other Linux distro packages here: WSL distro packages.



Docker for Windows Update Linux Containers

How to run Docker Linux Container on Windows 10 Fall Creator Update

I just blogged about how to run a Docker Linux Container natively on the new Windows Server version 1709. Docker today released a new update for Docker on Windows which also enables this scenario a little bit easier on your Windows 10 machine. It will ask you if you want to use the new feature to run Linux Containers natively on a Hyper-V Container running on Windows 10 (without the Moby VM).

As you can see the only thing right now you have to turn the feature on and off, since in this technical preview it is not yet possible to run Linux and Windows containers in parallel. But I guess soon that will be the case.

What you need is:

  • Windows 10 Fall Creators Update (Build 16299, Version 1709, RS3)
  • Docker for Windows 17.10.0-ce-win36 (13788) or higher

Enable Linux Containers on Windows

You can change the settings in the Docker Settings:

Docker for Windows Settings Enable Linux contianers on Windows

With hat setting on you can now run Linux Containers such as ubuntu on Windows directly, without having a Linux Virutal Machine running in the background to host the Linux containers.

Docker Run Ubuntu on Windows 10 Verions

Now you can also do some other fancy things like run the Azure CLI in a Linux Container on Windows 10.

Docker Azure CLI on Linux on Windows 10 Container

Simple and effective, and it will be even more powerful when you can run Linux and Windows Container in parallel on Windows Sever and on Windows 10.



Ubuntu on Microsoft Azure

Microsoft and Canonical create Azure optimized Ubuntu Kernel

Ubuntu is a popular choice for Virtual Machines running on Microsoft Azure and Hyper-V. Yesterday Microsoft and Canonical that they will provide an Azure Tailored Kernel for Ubuntu. Microsoft and Canonical were already working on a lot of projects together, like Linux Containers on Windows using Docker, or the Windows Subsystem for Linux.

Canonical, with the team at Microsoft Azure, are now delighted to announce that as of September 21, 2017, Ubuntu Cloud Images for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS on Azure have been enabled with a new Azure tailored Ubuntu kernel by default.  The Azure tailored Ubuntu kernel will receive the same level of support and security maintenance as all supported Ubuntu kernels for the duration of the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS support life.

The kernel itself is provided by the linux-azure kernel package. Some of the special feature this kernel provides are:

  • Infiniband and RDMAcapability for Azure HPC to deliver optimized performance of compute intensive workloads on Azure A8, A9, H-series, and NC24r.
  • Full support for Accelerated Networking in Azure.  Direct access to the PCI device provides gains in overall network performance offering the highest throughput and lowest latency for guests in Azure.  Transparent SR-IOV eliminates configuration steps for bonding network devices.
  • NAPI and Receive Segment Coalescing for 10% greater throughput on guests not using SR-IOV.
  • 18% reduction in kernel size
  • Hyper-V socket capability — a socket-based host/guest communication method that does not require a network.
  • The very latest Hyper-V device drivers and feature support available.

Source: https://insights.ubuntu.com/2017/09/21/microsoft-and-canonical-increase-velocity-with-azure-tailored-kernel/

I am sure these improvements will not only help Ubuntu Virtual Machines running on Azure, but also Ubuntu Virtual Machines running on Hyper-V

Canonical and Microsoft also promise to work close in the future to deliver more new feature.

As we continue to collaborate closely with various Microsoft teams on public cloud, private cloud, containers and services, you can expect further boosts in performance, simplification of operations at scale, and enablement of new innovations and technologies.

Really looking forward how this works. Also funny to see the comments on the Tweet from the @Ubuntu on twitter, which shows how many people live in the old world.



Linux on Windows 10

Crazy times – You can now run Linux on Windows 10 from the Windows Store

In the past weeks, some crazy things are happening. Think you’re way back in the time of 2003, could you have ever imagined that Microsoft offers you to run Linux on Windows 10? Well, this is exactly what is happening in the past months.

With one of the Windows 10 releases, Microsoft added the Windows Subsystem for Linux, which allowed you to run a Ubuntu version on your Windows 10 devices. In the past few days and weeks, Microsoft now announced that you can now download and install SUSE Enterprise Server, openSUSE Leap and Ubuntu (my guess there will be more to come) from the Windows Store. All you need today is the latest Windows Insider Build 16237 (it also works with a couple of older insider builds), and you will be able to install these versions. For the mainstream, this will be available in the Windows 10 Fall Creators Update arriving in the Fall of 2017. The Windows Subsystem for Linux will also be part in the next Windows Server RS3 release.

Ubuntu Windows 10 Store

If you want to know more about how it works check out Scott Hanselman blog about Ubuntu now in the Windows Store: Updates to Linux on Windows 10 and Important Tips

One great thing, Scott describes in his blog if you want to configure the different Windows Subsystems for Linux and for example, set the default one, you can use the command line with the wslconfig utility.

WSLConfig on Windows 10

wslconfig #Set default distribution to Ubuntu wslconfig /s Ubuntu

At the Microsoft Build conference 2019, Microsoft also showed the latest Windows Subsystem for Linux 2 (WSL 2). If you have any questions, let me know in the comments.



Bash on Windows 10

How to Install Linux Bash on Windows 10

With the Windows 10 Anniversary Update, which was released by Microsoft in Summer 2016, Microsoft included a Windows Subsystem for Linux in Windows 10. This allows you to enable Linux Bash on Windows 10. In this blog post I quickly want to show how you can enable the Windows Subsystem for Linux on Windows 10. This is great if you want to use some Linux tools on your Windows 10 machine. I use it for example to use SSH to connect to Linux Virtual Machines on Azure.

First you have the following requirements:

  • Windows 10 Anniversary Update – Windows 10 Build 14393 and higher
  • 64-bit versions of Windows 10
  • Internet Connection to download the Windows Subsystem for Linux in Windows
  • Active Developer Mode in Windows 10

First enable Developer Mode There are two option you can do this

Open the Settings App, go to Update & Security, go to For developers and enable Developer mode:

Windows 10 - Developer Mode

You can also use the following PowerShell command to enable Developer Mode:

 
reg add "HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\AppModelUnlock" /t REG_DWORD /f /v "AllowDevelopmentWithoutDevLicense" /d "1"

After this you can enable the Windows Subsystem for Linux as a Windows Feature in the Control Panel or PowerShell

Windows 10 - Windows Subsystem for Linux

Run the following PowerShell command to enable the Windows Subsystem for Linux:

Enable Windows Subsystem for Linux using PowerShell

 
Enable-WindowsOptionalFeature -Online -FeatureName Microsoft-Windows-Subsystem-Linux

After that you will need to restart your computer.

Now you can open up PowerShell or the command prompt and start using bash. (You can also start Bash directly from the Start Menu)

Bash on Windows 10

Hope this helps you to get started.