Tag: PowerShell 7

Add a PowerShell Remoting Session in the Windows Terminal Menu

Add a PowerShell Remote Session in Windows Terminal

I am sure you have heard about the new Windows Terminal, which is in preview, and you can get it from the Windows Store. In this blog post, I want to share how you can add a PowerShell remote session to the drop-down menu in the Windows Terminal when you open a new tab. The new Windows Terminal is highly customizable and it allows you to run different shells like the classic command prompt, Windows PowerShell, PowerShell 7, and also Windows Subsystem for Linux shells (I am using, for example, Ubuntu with the Windows Subsystem for Linux 2 (WSL 2)).

Scott Hanselman wrote a great blog post on how you can add tabs to open an SSH connection directly, so why not do the same thing with PowerShell? In my example, I will add a tab in Windows Terminal, which opens up a PowerShell remoting session (using WS-Management WSMan) to an Azure virtual machine (VM). However, this would work with every other machine which you can access using PowerShell Remoting.

Add a PowerShell Remote Session in Windows Terminal Tab

To get started, we need to open up the settings of the Windows Terminal. This will open up a profiles.json file, which you can edit in your favorite editor, for example, Visual Studio Code. To add new “menu items,” you will need to add a profile to the profiles array in the JSON file. In my case, I will add two to different menu items, once I am going to do a PowerShell remoting session to an Azure VM using Windows PowerShell and in the other, I am going to use PowerShell 7.

Windows Terminal Settings profiles

Windows Terminal Settings profiles

You can see here the following to profile entries:

Remote Session using Windows PowerShell 5.1

{
"name":  "PS Thomas AzureVM",
"tabTitle": "PS Thomas Maurer AzureVM",
"commandline": "powershell.exe -NoProfile -NoExit -Command Enter-PSSession -ComputerName azurevmps.westeurope.cloudapp.azure.com -Credential thomas",
"icon": "C:/Users/thoma/Downloads/AzureVMIcon32.png"
},

Remote Session using PowerShell 7

{
"name":  "PS Thomas AzureVM",
"tabTitle": "PS Thomas Maurer AzureVM",
"commandline": "pwsh.exe -NoProfile -NoExit -Command Enter-PSSession -ComputerName azurevmps.westeurope.cloudapp.azure.com -Credential thomas",
"icon": "C:/Users/thoma/Downloads/AzureVMIcon32.png"
},

As you can see, we define the profile name and the tab title in for the Windows Terminal entry. We have the command line command here, which starts the PowerShell remoting session. The command opens a PowerShell session to a specific computer or server using the ComputerName parameter and the Credential parameter for the credentials. In my case, I am connecting to an Azure VM with the name azurevmps.westeurope.cloudapp.azure.com (could also be an IP address) and the username Thomas. The last thing I add is a small icon (32×32 pixel) since I am connecting to an Azure VM, I took the Azure VM icon.

In this scenario, I am using PowerShell Remoting over HTTP, you can use the same thing for your connections using PowerShell Remoting over HTTPS or even PowerShell Remoting over SSH which are way more secure, and should be used for your connections.

Now your Windows Terminal drop-down menu will look like this:

Add a PowerShell Remote Session in Windows Terminal Tab

Add a PowerShell Remote Session in Windows Terminal Tab

By selecting one of these profiles, you will automatically open a PowerShell remoting session to a specific computer or server in Windows Terminal.

Windows Terminal - Azure virtual machine VM PS Remote Session

Windows Terminal – Azure virtual machine VM PS Remote Session

I hope this gives you an idea of how you can add a PowerShell remote session in Windows Terminal menu. If you want to know more about the Windows Terminal, check out the following blog, and if you have any questions, please feel free to leave a comment.

If you want to know more about what’s new in PowerShell 7, check out my blog.



PowerShell ISE Mode in Visual Studio Code

How to use PowerShell ISE Mode in Visual Studio Code

If you are writing PowerShell code, you might have realized that there weren’t really improvements to the PowerShell Integrated Scripting Environment (PowerShell ISE) in the last couple of releases. With PowerShell becoming more popular on cross-platform systems, Visual Studio Code (VS Code) becomes the editor of choice. However, by default Visual Studio Code has a different behavior than the PowerShell ISE. To make it even easier, the latest PowerShell extension for Visual Studio Code, now includes PowerShell ISE Mode. PowerShell ISE Mode in Visual Studio Code, helps you to replicate and enable the settings from the following Microsoft Docs article: How to replicate the ISE experience in Visual Studio Code.

The ISE was first introduced with Windows PowerShell V2 and was re-designed with PowerShell V3. The ISE is supported in all supported versions of Windows PowerShell up to and including Windows PowerShell V5.1.

The PowerShell ISE is no longer in active feature development. As a shipping component of Windows, it continues to be officially supported for security and high-priority servicing fixes. We currently have no plans to remove the ISE from Windows.

There is no support for the ISE in PowerShell v6 and beyond.



What's new in PowerShell 7

What’s new in PowerShell 7 – Check it out!

As you know, the PowerShell team just released the new PowerShell version called PowerShell 7. PowerShell 7 will brings a couple of new features and enhancements not only for users who used PowerShell Core 6 but also for people who are currently using Windows PowerShell 5.0. I want to quickly give you an overview of what’s new in PowerShell 7.

New feature enhancements – What’s new in PowerShell 7

There are many enhancements in PowerShell 7 to make it the best PowerShell version yet. It is almost impossible to list all of them in one single blog post, so I will focus on the once, which are the most important once for me.

Out-GridView, -ShowWindow and other GUI cmdlets are back on Windows

With .NET Core 3 brining back WPF support on Windows, the PowerShell team was able to bring back some of the popular graphical tools and cmdlets like Out-Gridview, Show-Command, and the Get-Help -ShowWindow.

Show-Command PowerShell 7

Show-Command PowerShell 7

ForEach-Object -Parallel

Since I started using PowerShell and get into working with objects, ForEach-Object was one of the most critical cmdlets. By adding the -Parallel parameter to the ForEach-Object cmdlet, you can execute a scriptblock in parallel, similar to the option we had with PSWorkflow. With that performance can get so much better if you are working with a broad set of objects. You can also optionally set the maximum threads, which will be used in parallel (the default thread count is set to 5) with the -ThrottleLimit parameter.



PowerShell 7 Installer

How to Install and Update PowerShell 7

The PowerShell team just announced PowerShell 7. PowerShell 7 is built on .NET Core 3 and brings back many APIs required by modules built on .NET Framework so that they work with .NET Core runtime. While PowerShell Core 6 was focusing on bringing cross-platform compatibility, PowerShell 7 will focus on making it a viable replacement for Windows PowerShell 5.1 and bringing near parity with Windows PowerShell. Here is how you can install and update PowerShell 7 on Windows and Linux using a simple one-liner.

If you want to know what’s new in PowerShell 7, check out my blog post!

One great example of how cross-platform PowerShell can work, check out my blog post: How to set up PowerShell SSH Remoting.

Install PowerShell 7

Before showing you the one-liner option to install PowerShell 7, I want to share with you the documentation to install PowerShell 7 on different operating systems like Windows, macOS, and Linux.

One-liner to install or update PowerShell 7 on Windows 10

Install and Update PowerShell 7

You can use this single command in Windows PowerShell to install PowerShell 7.

iex "& { $(irm https://aka.ms/install-powershell.ps1) } -UseMSI"

There are additional switches to, for example, install daily builds of the latest PowerShell previews.

-Destination
The destination path to install PowerShell Core to.

-Daily
Install PowerShell Core from the daily build.
Note that the ‘PackageManagement’ module is required to install a daily package.

-Preview
Install the latest preview, which is currently version 7.

-UseMSI
Use the MSI installer.

-Quiet
The quiet command for the MSI installer.

-DoNotOverwrite
Do not overwrite the destination folder if it already exists.

-AddToPath
On Windows, add the absolute destination path to the ‘User’ scope environment variable ‘Path’;
On Linux, make the symlink ‘/usr/bin/pwsh’ points to “$Destination/pwsh”;
On MacOS, make the symlink ‘/usr/local/bin/pwsh’ points to “$Destination/pwsh”.

One-liner to install or update PowerShell 7 on Linux

Install PowerShell 7 on Linux

You can use this as a single command to install PowerShell 7 on Linux.

wget https://aka.ms/install-powershell.sh; sudo bash install-powershell.sh; rm install-powershell.sh

Depending on your distro you are using, this will register Microsoft’s pkg repos and install that package (deb or rpm).

You can also use the following switches:

-includeide
Installs VSCode and VSCode PowerShell extension (only relevant to machines with a desktop environment)

-interactivetesting
Do a quick launch test of VSCode (only applicable when used with -includeide)

-skip-sudo-check
Use sudo without verifying its availability (hard to accurately do on some distros)

-preview
Installs the latest preview release of PowerShell side-by-side with any existing production releases

To currently run the PowerShell Preview, you can run the following command:

pwsh

After Installing

After you have installed PowerShell 7, also make sure to update PowerShellGet and the PackageManagement module.

If you have any questions, please let me know in the comments.