Tag: Monitor

How to monitor an Azure virtual machine with Azure Monitor

How to Monitor an Azure virtual machine with Azure Monitor

This week in the Azure tip video, we are going to have a look at how to monitor an Azure virtual machine (VM) with Azure Monitor. You can use Azure Monitor to collect and analyze monitoring data from Azure virtual machines to maintain their health. Virtual machines can be monitored for availability and performance with Azure Monitor like any other Azure resource, but they’re unique from other resources since you also need to monitor the guest operating and system and the workloads that run in it.

To learn more about how to monitor Azure virtual machines (VMs) with Azure Monitor, you can check out the following links:

  • Microsoft Docs: Monitoring Azure virtual machines with Azure Monitor
  • Quickstart: Monitor an Azure virtual machine with Azure Monitor

You can also check out how you can connect Windows Server machines in hybrid environments to Azure Monitor using Windows Admin Center here. If you have any questions, comments, or another great idea for an Azure tip video, feel free to leave a comment below.



Monitoring and Insights for Azure Arc enabled Servers and Azure Monitor

Monitoring and Insights for Azure Arc enabled Servers

As many customers are moving to a hybrid cloud environment, where they run servers and applications not just in Microsoft Azure, but also on-premises, at the edge, or even in a multi-cloud environment, Azure Arc can provide them with a single control plane to manage all of these servers. One of the management capabilities you can enable for servers running outside of Azure Arc is monitoring and insights. With monitoring and insights for your, Azure Arc enabled servers, you can use Azure Monitor to keep control of your hybrid environment directly from Azure. In this blog post, we are going to have a quick look at how you can leverage Azure Monitor for monitoring and insights for your Azure Arc enabled servers.

Before you can get started to use the monitoring and insights feature for your servers, you will need to add the server to Azure Arc and deploy the Azure Monitoring Agent. You can also learn more about the new extensions in my video. You can connect your hybrid servers running Linux or Windows Server, running on-premises, at the edge, or even another cloud provider.

Monitoring and Insights for Azure Arc enabled Servers using Azure Monitor

After you have connected the server, which can be a Windows Server or a Linux server, you can enable Insights within the Azure portal. Just navigate to the Azure Arc enabled servers and on the menu, you can find insights. Here you can now find Azure Monitor tools like the dependency map to view a map directly from a VM or view a map from Azure Monitor to see the components across groups of VMs.

Azure Arc Enabled Server Monitoring and Insights Dependency Map

Azure Arc Enabled Server Monitoring and Insights Dependency Map

You can learn more about dependency maps in Azure Monitor on Microsoft Docs.

Another part of insights for your Azure Arc enabled servers is performance monitoring. Azure Monitor includes a set of performance charts that target several key performance indicators (KPIs) to help you determine how well a virtual machine is performing. The charts show resource utilization over a period of time so you can identify bottlenecks, anomalies, or switch to a perspective listing each machine to view resource utilization based on the metric selected.

Azure Arc Enabled Server Performance Monitoring

Azure Arc Enabled Server Performance Monitoring

The following capacity utilization charts are provided:

  • CPU Utilization % – defaults showing the average and top 95th percentile
  • Available Memory – defaults showing the average, top 5th, and 10th percentile
  • Logical Disk Space Used % – defaults showing the average and 95th percentile
  • Logical Disk IOPS – defaults showing the average and 95th percentile
  • Logical Disk MB/s – defaults showing the average and 95th percentile
  • Max Logical Disk Used % – defaults showing the average and 95th percentile
  • Bytes Sent Rate – defaults showing average bytes sent
  • Bytes Receive Rate – defaults showing average bytes received

You can learn more about performance monitoring in Azure Monitor on Microsoft Docs.

If you want to learn more about Azure Arc enabled servers monitoring, I recommend that you follow the Tutorial: Monitor a hybrid machine with Azure Monitor for VMs.

I hope that quick blog post provide you with an overview about monitoring and insights for Azure Arc enabled servers in a hybrid cloud environment. If you have any questions, feel free to leave a comment.



Collect data from a Windows computer in a hybrid environment with Azure Monitor

Collect data from a Windows computer in a hybrid environment with Azure Monitor

I quickly want to share some of our new Azure tips videos. In this video, we are going to have a look at how to collect data from a Windows computer in a hybrid environment with Azure Monitor. Azure Monitor can collect data directly from your physical or virtual Windows computers in your environment into a Log Analytics workspace for detailed analysis and correlation. Installing the Log Analytics agent allows Azure Monitor to collect data from a datacenter or other cloud environment. This video shows you how to configure and collect data from your Windows computer with a few easy steps.

You can find more information about how to collect data from a Windows computer in a hybrid environment with Azure Monitor on Microsoft Docs. You can also check out the following the quickstart guide.

If you have any questions or comments, feel free to leave a comment below.



Azure Arc Enabled Servers Extension Management

Azure Arc Enabled Servers Extension Management

Azure Arc for Server just got a couple of new features. In this blog post, we are going to have a look at the new feature on Azure Arc enabled servers called extension management. This new Azure Arc enabled servers features allows you not only to deploy extensions like the Custom Script Extension, or the Microsoft Monitoring Agent but also enable features like Azure Update Management, Inventory, Change Tracking, and more for your servers running in a hybrid environment.

Introducing Azure Arc
For customers who want to simplify complex and distributed environments across on-premises, edge and multicloud, Azure Arc enables deployment of Azure services anywhere and extends Azure management to any infrastructure.
Learn more about Azure Arc here.

Azure Arc enabled servers already could benefit from several Azure Resource Manager features like Tags, Policies, RBAC, and some Azure Management features like logs and Azure Policy. With the new update, you can start using more extensions.  With these extensions available, Azure Arc enabled servers also get features like Azure Update Management, Inventory, Change Tracking, and insights capabilities.

Azure Arc Azure Management Control Plane

Azure Arc Azure Management Control Plane

Azure Arc Enabled Servers Extension Management Video

You can also watch my summary video on YouTube.



New Windows Server Performance Monitor

New Performance Monitor for Windows Server

In this blog post, I am going to show you the new Windows Performance Monitor feature in Windows Admin Center. This feature was announced publicly at Microsoft Ignite 2019. But before we are going to have a look at the new Windows Admin Center Performance Monitor extension, it is time for some history. If you have worked with Windows or Windows Server in the past, you almost certainly have used a tool called perfmon.exe, or Windows Performance Monitor.

You can use Windows Performance Monitor to examine how programs affect your computer’s performance, both in real-time and by collecting log data for later analysis. It uses performance counters, event trace data, and configuration information, which can be combined into Data Collector Sets. Perfmon exists already for a long time. It is super powerful for troubleshooting Windows. However, it is definitely if you look at the classic MMC user-interface and the user-experience in general, probably not your favorite tool to use. That is why we needed something better.

Perfmon

Perfmon.exe

Windows Reliability and Performance Monitor is a Microsoft Management Console (MMC) snap-in that provides tools for analyzing system performance. From a single console, you can monitor application and hardware performance in real time, customize what data you want to collect in logs, define thresholds for alerts and automatic actions, generate reports, and view past performance data in a variety of ways.

You can find more about the classic perfmon.exe here.

A couple of weeks ago, I was contacted by Windows Server Program Manager Cosmos Darwin, who works at great features in Windows Server like Storage Spaces Direct. He asked me if I remember my feedback item in user voice, which I created a couple of years ago.

Windows Server Windows Admin Center User Voice Feedback

Windows Server Windows Admin Center User Voice Feedback

Back then, I wasn’t working for Microsoft, but I was working in a couple of different projects where we were using Windows Server and needed to build a real-time performance monitoring system. Which allowed us to monitor remote servers and clusters.

And here it is, the shiny new Windows Admin Center Performance Monitor extension. This new UI is integrated into the web-based Windows Admin Center management tool.

Windows Admin Center Performance Monitor

Windows Admin Center Performance Monitor

Using the Performance Monitor extension in Windows Admin Center uses the same performance data as perfmon, like performance counters, which means that it will just work with your existing configuration. However, it adds a couple of benefits. No worries, the classic perfmon.exe is still there for you to use it.

  • Easy Remoting ✔ – You can easily use it on your remote machine. Windows Admin Center uses PowerShell remoting in the background to connect to the remote computer.
  • Share Workspaces ✔ – You can create workspaces that you can save and use for multiple systems within the same Windows Admin Center instance. But you can also export them and import them on other Windows Admin Center gateway installations.

    Upload and Download Workspaces

    Upload and Download Workspaces

  • Search and highlighting ✔ – You can easily search for objects and counters. Performance Monitor also highlights the useful objects for your system. So you don’t have to guess which counter to use.

    Performance Monitor Search Counter

    Performance Monitor Search Counter

  • Different Graph Types ✔ – You can use different types of graphs, which make it easier to find and compare the right information depending on your scenario.

    Min-Max View

    Min-Max View

    Windows Server Performance Monitor Heatmap

    Windows Server Performance Monitor Heatmap

     

I hope this gives you a quick overview of the new Performance Monitor extension in Windows Admin Center. You can get Windows Admin Center from here. If you have any questions, feel free to leave a comment. There is also a short survey, about different tools like perfmon, this will directly influence the work on Windows Admin Center. You can check out the official announcement blog here.

By the way, Windows Admin Center also offers a great set of Azure Hybrid services integration. Check out my blog post and videos about the Azure Hybrid services in Windows Admin Center.



Set Windows 10 Wallpaper Background

Windows 10 – How to set different wallpapers for multiple monitors in the Settings app

A lot of people have multiple monitors in their workplace setup today and want to use different Windows 10 Wallpaper per screen. This blog post is about how you can set different wallpapers for multiple monitors in Windows 10. I know there are already many articles and blog post out there covering this. But Microsoft changed this in the latest or next Windows 10 release, called Windows 10 1809 or codename Redstone 5 (RS5). Microsoft moved the settings menu from the Control Panel complete to the Windows Settings app. You want to be able to use the classic Control Panel to change your wallpapers, and most how-to blogs did refer to that method. So here is how you can do this in the Windows 10 Settings app.

Setting a different wallpaper per Windows 10 is pretty easy now. Just open up the Windows 10 settings app. You can do this using the start menu or by pressing “Win” + “I”, which will also open the Settings app.

Windows 10 Settings

Now you navigate to Personalization and if not automatically selected, to Background. Here is very you can change the Windows 10 Desktop Wallpaper. Of course, there are many other ways to get here, as well. For example, by doing a right click on the Desktop and select Personalization or using the command line:

Press “WIN” + “R” and run the following command:

 
control /name Microsoft.Personalization /page pageWallpaper

Set the Windows 10 Wallpaper of different Monitors

Set Windows 10 Wallpaper Background

You are now in the right place to change the desktop background. First, browse and open the pictures you want to use as your desktop wallpaper. If you click on the Windows 10 wallpaper now, it will change the wallpaper on call screens. To only change it on one of them, right-click it and select the monitor on which you want to change it. Setting different Windows 10 backgrounds per screen has never been more comfortable.



Toms Workplace 2018

My Workplace 2018 – How does yours look like?

Last week I was browsing the web and I found a lot of cool looking home office setups. I realized it is quiet interesting to see how people workplaces look like. With that I want to give a quick look at my home office and my workplace setup. Secondly, I would like to share your setup as well. If you want to share yours write a blog, link it in the comments or show it on Twitter, what ever you like.

This is it, this is my workplace if I am not on the road.

  • My main machine today is the 15-inch Surface Book 2 attached to a Dell curved-ultrawide monitor (Dell UltraSharp 38 Monitor – U3818DW), which with Windows 10 and the Snap feature is absolutely great to use.
  • I also have a Surface Pro as a company work machine, which I use mostly on the road when I need a real mobile work machine. It has enough powerful to do serious work and still gives you a mobile work experience.
  • I am obviously using a lot of Surface accessories like the Surface Precision Mouse, the Surface Pen, the Surface Dial and the Microsoft Modern Keyboard.
  • I also use some wireless Bose Quiet Comfort 35 headphones, not only for travel but also in the home office
  • I like the Surface Pen on my Surface Pro to draw some quick stuff or take some notes in Onenote.