Tag: CLI

Run Azure Container Instances from the Docker CLI

Run Azure Container Instances from the Docker CLI

Earlier Docker announced the partnership with Microsoft to bring support to run Azure Container Instances (ACI) from the Docker CLI. Yesterday, Docker announced and released the first Docker Desktop Edge version (2.3.2), which allows you to try out that new feature. Azure Container Instances (ACI) allow you to run Docker containers on-demand in a managed, serverless Azure environment. Azure Container Instances is a solution for any scenario that can operate in isolated containers, without orchestration.

Run Azure Container Instances from the Docker CLI

To be able to run ACI containers using the Docker CLI, Docker expanded the existing docker context command to support ACI as a new backend. To start using this new feature you will need to run Docker Desktop Edge version 2.3.2 and an Azure subscription. You can create a free Azure account with 12 months of free services, $200 credit, and over 25 services which are always free.

Docker Desktop Azure ACI Integration

Docker Desktop Azure ACI Integration

Now you can start your Docker CLI and login to Azure:

docker login azure

After you are logged in, you will need to create a new ACI context. You can simply use “docker context create aci” command and add your Azure subscription and Resource Group, or the CLI will provide you with an Interactive experience.

docker context create aci myazure

With “docker context ls” you can see the added ACI context.

docker context ls
Docker Desktop CLI create Azure Container Instance ACI Context Integration

Docker Desktop CLI create Azure Container Instance ACI Context Integration

Now you can switch to the newly added ACI context.

docker context use myazure

Now you can start running containers directly on Azure Container Instance using the Docker CLI.

docker run -d -p 80:80 mycontainer

You can also see the running containers using docker ps.

docker ps
Run Azure Container Instances from the Docker CLI

Run Azure Container Instances from the Docker CLI

This will also show you the public IP address of your running container to access it. In my example I used a demo container, however, you can also use your own container which you pushed to a container registry like Docker Hub.

You can also run multi-container applications using Docker Compose. You can find an example for that here.

Try Azure Container Instances from the Docker CLI

This new experience is now available as part of Docker Desktop Edge 2.3.2 . To get started, simply download the latest Edge release or update if you are already on Desktop Edge and create a free Azure account with 12 months of free services, $200 credit, and over 25 services which are always free.

Conclusion

I hope this gives you a short overview of how you can use the Docker CLI to directly run Docker containers in Azure Container Instances (ACI). If you have any questions, feel free to leave a comment.

There are also many other great examples like running Docker Linux containers on Windows, using the Windows Subsystem for Linux 2 (WSL 2).



How to Configure Azure CLI Default Output

How to Configure Azure CLI Default Output Format

The Azure command-line interface (Azure CLI) is a set of commands used to create and manage Azure resources. In this blog post, I am going to show you how you can configure the Azure CLI default output format.

If you have used the Azure resources on your machine or in Azure Cloud Shell, you are aware that if you are running a command, the output you get is in the JSON format. This is great if you are building some sort of automation. However, if you are using in in the command line, it might not be the best way to read the output. You can change the output by using --output table or -o table to make it more human-readable.

To install the Azure CLI check out my blog post here.

How to Configure Azure CLI Default Output

You can also configure the Azure CLI default output to always be a specific type like the table format by running the az configure command. The Azure CLI allows for user configuration for settings such as logging, data collection, output format, and default argument values. You can learn more about the Azure CLI configuration on Microsoft Docs.

Azure CLI az configure

Azure CLI az configure

With az configure, you can manage Azure CLI configuration with this command is interactive.

Azure CLI az configure default output

Azure CLI az configure default output

Here you can now change the default output format.

Azure CLI Tip – Use AI to find az commands
If you did use the Azure CLI, you might find this tip very handy. I am talking about the az find command. The az find command provides you with example commands based on Azure documentation and usage patterns of the Azure CLI and Azure Resource Manager users.

Conclusion

I hope this blog post shows you how to configure the Azure CLI default output format. Are you just getting started with the Azure CLI and want some introduction, check out the get started with Azure CLI Microsoft Docs page. If you have any questions let me know in the comments.



Azure Cloud Shell

Azure Cloud Shell – shell.azure.com and in Visual Studio Code

Back in May Microsoft made the Azure Cloud Shell available in the Microsoft Azure Portal. Now you can use it even quicker by just go to shell.azure.com. First you login with your Microsoft account or Work and School account, and if your account is in multiple Azure Active Directory tenants, you select the right tenant and you will be automatically logged in. So even if you are on a PC where you can not install the Azure CLI or the Azure PowerShell module, you can still easily fire up a shell where you can run the Azure CLI, Azure PowerShell and other CLI tools like Docker, Kubectl, emacs, vim, nano, git and more.

In addition you can also open up Azure Cloud Shell directly from Visual Studio Code

Azure Cloud Shell Visual Studio Code

With that, enjoy your holidays and I wish you a good start in the new year!



Azure Cloud Shell

Microsoft Azure Cloud Shell

Today at the Microsoft Build Conference, Microsoft announced the Azure Cloud Shell. The Azure Cloud Shell is a browser-based shell experience to manage and develop Azure resources.

Azure Cloud Shell offers a browser-accessible, pre-configured shell experience for managing Azure resources without the overhead of installing, versioning, and maintaining a machine yourself. Today it gives you a variety of different tools directly from your web browser in the Azure Portal.

This gives Azure Administrators an easy admin environment to manage resources as well as third-party applications. In the background Microsoft runs thousands of isolated containers, ready for you to use. Microsoft takes care of keeping this container up to date, so you can focus on your administrator tasks. The usage is free, the only thing you will need to pay, are the storage cost for your container and the things you store on the Azure File Share.

Linux shell interpreter

  • Bash
  • sh

Azure tools

  • Azure CLI 2.0 and 1.0

Text editors

  • vim
  • nano
  • emacs

Source control

  • git

Build tools

  • make
  • maven
  • npm
  • pip

Containers

  • Docker
  • Kubectl
  • DC/OS CLI

Databases

  • MySQL client
  • PostgreSql client
  • sqlcmd Utility

Other

  • iPython Client

It also looks like PowerShell will be available later, hopefully it will arrive soon. Microsoft also announced Azure PowerShell 3.0. If you want to learn, check out my blog post: Mastering Azure with Cloud Shell