Tag: VMs

Last updated by at .

Azure Stack VM Update Management

Using Azure Update Management on Azure Stack

At Microsoft Ignite 2018, Microsoft announced the integration of Azure Update and Configuration Management on Azure Stack. This is a perfect example how Azure services from the public cloud can be extended into your datacenter using Azure Stack. Azure Update and Configuration Management brings Azure Update Management, Change Tracking and Inventory to your Azure Stack VMs. In the case of Azure Stack, the backend services and orchestrator like Azure Automation and Log Analytics, will remain to run in Azure, but it lets you connect your VMs running on Azure Stack.

Azure Update and Configuration Managemen Schemat

Today, the Azure Update and Configuration Management extension, gives you the following features:

  • Update Management – With the Update Management solution, you can quickly assess the status of available updates on all agent computers and manage the process of installing required updates for these Windows VMs.
  • Change Tracking – Changes to installed software, Windows services, Windows registry, and files on the monitored servers are sent to the Log Analytics service in the cloud for processing. Logic is applied to the received data and the cloud service records the data. By using the information on the Change Tracking dashboard, you can easily see the changes that were made in your server infrastructure.
  • Inventory – The Inventory tracking for an Azure Stack Windows virtual machine provides a browser-based user interface for setting up and configuring inventory collection.

If you want to use Azure Update Management and more on VMs on-premise (without Azure Stack) or running at another Cloud Provider, you can do this as well. Have a look at Windows Admin Center, which allows you to directly integrate with Azure Update Management. However, there will be a difference in pricing.



Azure Stack GPU Support

Microsoft and OEMs working on Azure Stack GPU Support

This week at the Microsoft Ingnite 2018 conference in Orlando FL, Microsoft invited customers and partners from all over the world. In one of the sessions about Azure Stack, Daniel Savage (Principal PM Manager at Microsoft) announced that Microsoft is working on GPU support for Azure Stack. Azure Stack GPU support will bring Azure n-series virtual machines to Azure Stack which then can be used for various scenarios. This was not publicly announced yet in the Azure Stack roadmap, which was last updated in February 2018 and will soon see a refresh.

Microsoft was not mentioning the exact timeline, but it looks like when can expect this in the near future.

Azure Stack Key Roadmap Azure Services

For Azure Services on Azure Stack, Microsoft also announced that Microsoft is not only working on bringing Azure IoT Hub to Azure Stack (which was announced a while ago), but also bringing Event Hub down to Azure Stack. One of the main reasons for this is that IoT Hub has some dependencies on Azure Event Hub.

You can watch the full session on the Microsoft Ignite page.



Hyper-V Nested Virtualization

Nested Virtualization in Windows Server 2016 and Windows 10

I already wrote a blog post bout Nested Virtualization in Windows 10 some weeks ago. With Technical Preview 4 of Windows Server 2016 Microsoft also introduced Nested Virtualization in Windows Server Hyper-V. Nested Virtualization allows you to run a Hypervisor inside a Virtual Machine running on a Hypervisor. This is a great case for demo and lab environment and also if you want to run Virtual Hyper-V servers in Microsoft Azure IaaS Virtual Machines (we will see if Microsoft will support this in Azure in the future).

Requirements

  • At least 4 GB RAM available for the virtualized Hyper-V host.
  • To run at least Windows Server 2016 Technical Preview 4 or Windows 10 build 10565 on both the physical Hyper-V host and the virtualized host. Running the same build in both the physical and virtualized environments generally improves performance.
  • A processor with Intel VT-x (nested virtualization is available only for Intel processors at this time).
  • Other Hypervisors will not work

How to set it up

To enable Nested Virtualization in Hyper-V, Microsoft created a script you can use which I already documented in my first blog post about Nested Virtualization. But of course you can do this also manual doing the following steps:

  • disable Dynamic Memory on Virtual Machine
  • enable Virtualization Extensions on the vCPU
  • enable MAC Address Spoofing
  • set Memory of the Virtual Machine to a minimum of 4GB RAM

To set the Virtualization Extension for the vCPU you can use PowerShell:

Limitations

With Nested Virtualization there are coming some limitations:

  • Once nested virtualization is enabled in a virtual machine, the following features are no longer compatible with that VM.
    These actions will either fail, or cause the virtual machine not to start if it is hosting other virtual machines:

    • Dynamic memory must be OFF. This will prevent the VM from booting.
    • Runtime memory resize will fail.
    • Applying checkpoints to a running VM will fail.
    • Live migration will fail — in other words, a VM which hosts other VMs cannot be live migrated.
    • Save/restore will fail.
  • Hosts with Device Guard enabled cannot expose virtualization extensions to guests.
  • Hosts with Virtualization Based Security (VBS) enabled cannot expose virtualization extensions to guests. You must first disable VBS in order to preview nested virtualization.

For more information check out the Microsoft page about Hyper-V Nested Virtualization.

 

 

 

 



Licensing Microsoft Server in a Virtual Environment

Altaro Hyper-V Licensing Microsoft Server in a Virtual Environment webinar recording available

Together with Altaro I did a webinar on “Licensing Microsoft Server in a Virtual Environment” together with Andy Syrewicze (Microsoft MVP Hyper-V). Now the recording of this webinar is now available. You can also download the free eBook for Licensing Microsoft Server in a Virtual Environment from Eric Siron.



Building Clouds

Windows Azure for your Datacenter

Some years back, when Microsoft launched Windows Azure and I was working for a Hosting company, I remember that we were thinking and talking about this and were hoping that Microsoft would make Windows Azure available for hosters. At the beginning of last year Microsoft made this step by releasing Windows Azure Services for Windows Server and together with Windows Server, Hyper-V and System Center you could build your own Windows Azure. With the R2 wave of System Center and Windows Server, Microsoft also renamed Windows Azure Services for Windows Server to Windows Azure Pack (wow what a great idea ;-)) and added some great new functionality to the product it self.

Windows Azure Pack Archtiecture Overview

Windows Azure Pack is a collection of Windows Azure technologies, available to Microsoft customers at no additional cost for installation into your data center. It runs on top of Windows Server 2012 R2 and System Center 2012 R2 and, through the use of the Windows Azure technologies, enables you to offer a rich, self-service, multi-tenant cloud, consistent with the public Windows Azure experience.

The Windows Azure Pack is basically a framework which offers you to build several offerings for customers.

  • VM Cloud – This is an infrastructure-as-a-service (IaaS) offering which allows customer to deploy and manage Windows and Linux Virtual Machines including VM Template, scaling and Virtual Networking options.
  • Web Sites – a service that helps provide a high-density, scalable shared web hosting platform for ASP.NET, PHP, and Node.js web applications. The Web Sites service includes a customizable web application gallery of open source web applications and integration with source control systems for custom-developed web sites and applications.
  • Service Bus – a service that provides reliable messaging services between distributed applications. The Service Bus service includes queued and topic-based publish/subscribe capabilities.
  • SQL and MySQL – services that provide database instances. These databases can be used in conjunction with the Web Sites service.
  • Automation and Extensibility – the capability to automate and integrate additional custom services into the services framework, including a runbook editor and execution environment.

Source: TechNet

On top of this Windows Azure Pack offers two management portals, one for tenants and one for administrators which are build on top of the Service Management API. The Service Management API is a RESTful API which allows you build some custom scenarios such as custom portals or billing integrations on top of the Azure Pack framework.

Windows Azure Pack IaaS

In the last months I had time to work within several different project with the integration of Windows Azure Pack, mainly with the VM Cloud and automation integration and also some work with the Service Management API and some customization together with Stefan Johner and Fulvio Ferrarini from itnetx. I will write some blog post about Windows Azure Pack, the stuff we have done and we are doing right now.

If you are looking for some good blogs around Windows Azure Pack you should definitely checkout the blogs from Marc van Eijk, Hans Vredevoort and Kristian Nese or the Windows Azure Pack Wiki on TechNet. And btw. Windows Azure Pack is not just made for hoster and service providers, it is also a great solution for enterprises, check out why by reading Michael Rueeflis blog.

 



Capacity Planner for Hyper-V Replica

Capacity Planner for Hyper-V Replica updated

Back in 2013 Microsoft released a tool called Capacity Planner for Hyper-V Replica. Hyper-V Replica Capacity Planner allowed IT Administrators to measure and plan their Replica integration based on the workload, storage, network, and server characteristics. Today Aashish Ramdas announced on the TechNet Virtualization blog that Microsoft has updated the Hyper-V Replica Capacity Planner. The new version now support Windows Server 2012 R2 Hyper-V, Windows Azure Hyper-V Recovery Manager and some other cool stuff based on the feedback of customers.

  • Support for Windows Server 2012 and Windows Server 2012 R2 in a single tool
  • Support for Extended Replication
  • Support for virtual disks placed on NTFS, CSVFS, and SMB shares
  • Monitoring of multiple standalone hosts simultaneously
  • Improved performance and scale – up to 100 VMs in parallel
  • Replica site input is optional – for those still in the planning stage of a DR strategy
  • Report improvements – e.g.: reporting the peak utilization of resources also
  • Improved guidance in documentation
  • Improved workflow and user experience

It’s great to see Microsoft improving free tools which help implement their solutions.