Tag: Ping

Get-NetIPConfiguration

Basic Networking PowerShell cmdlets cheatsheet to replace netsh, ipconfig, nslookup and more

Around 4 years ago I wrote a blog post about how to Replace netsh with Windows PowerShell which includes basic powershell networking cmdlets. After working with Microsoft Azure, Nano Server and Containers, PowerShell together with networking becomes more and more important. I created this little cheat sheet so it becomes easy for people to get started.

Basic Networking PowerShell cmdlets

Get-NetIPConfiguration

Get the IP Configuration (ipconfig with PowerShell)

List all Network Adapters

Get a spesific network adapter by name

Get more information VLAN ID, Speed, Connection status

Get driver information

Get adapter hardware information. This can be really usefull when you need to know the PCI slot of the NIC.

Disable and Enable a Network Adapter

Rename a Network Adapter

IP Configuration using PowerShell

PowerShell Networking Get-NetIPAddress

Get IP and DNS address information

Get IP address only

Get DNS Server Address information

Set IP Address

or if you want to change a existing IP Address

Remove IP Address

Set DNS Server

Set interface to DHCP

Clear DNS Cache with PowerShell

You can also manage your DNS cache with PowerShell.

List DNS Cache:

Clear DNS Cache

Ping with PowerShell

PowerShell Networking Test-NetConnection Ping

How to Ping with PowerShell. For a simple ping command with PowerShell, you can use the Test-Connection cmdlet:

There is an advanced way to test connection using PowerShell

Get some more details from the Test-NetConnection

Ping multiple IP using PowerShell

Tracert

PowerShell Tracert

Tracert with PowerShell

Portscan with PowerShell

PowerShell Portscan

Use PowerShell to check for open port

NSlookup in PowerShell

PowerShell Networking NSlookup

NSlookup using PowerShell:

Route in PowerShell

PowerShell Networking Route

How to replace Route command with PowerShell

NETSTAT in PowerShell

PowerShell Networking Netstat

How to replace NETSTAT with PowerShell

NIC Teaming PowerShell commands

Create a new NIC Teaming (Network Adapter Team)

SMB Related PowerShell commands

SMB PowerShell SMB Client Configuration

Get SMB Client Configuration

Get SMB Connections

Get SMB Mutlichannel Connections

Get SMB open files

Get SMB Direct (RDMA) adapters

Hyper-V Networking cmdlets

Hyper-V PowerShell Get-VMNetwork Adapter

Get and set Network Adapter VMQ settings

Get VM Network Adapter

Get VM Network Adapter IP Addresses

Get VM Network Adapter Mac Addresses

I hope you enjoyed it and the post was helpful, if you think something important is missing, please add it in the comments.



Test-NetConnection PowerShell Portscan

SuperPing – PowerShell Test-NetConnection

With Windows 8.1 and Windows Server 2012 R2 Microsoft released PowerShell v4 with new PowerShell modules and new PowerShell cmdlets. One of them is the new Test-NetConnection cmdlet which does basically replaces some simple network tools like Ping, Traceroute, Portscanner and more.

First if you just run Test-NetConnection this will check a Microsoft edge server and will tell you if your internet is working or not.

PowerShell Test-NetConnection

You can also ping other servers

Test-NetConnection Ping

If we have a closer look at this cmdlet we can see that we can do much more.

get-help get-testnetconnection

What we can do is something like a port scan. In this example I check if the RDP port is open on my webserver. Which is hopefully not 😉

Test-NetConnection PowerShell Portscan

You can also check for not so common ports by using the -Port parameter and entering the port number.
Another thing you could do would be a simple traceroute.

Test-NetConnection PowerShell Traceroute

If you want to do a ping -t you could use the following command

Ping -t with PowerShell

I hope this helps you a little 🙂

Find more networking PowerShell cmdlets in my PowerShell Networking cheatsheet.



PowerShell: Ping IP range

Powershell

Some you need to know which IP in a specific range is already in use. With Windows PowerShell there is a simple way to ping a IP range.

You can use the .Net class System.Net.Networkinformation.Ping to do this.

You can also have a look at the new Test-Connection or Test-NetConnection PowerShell cmdlets.