• Hyper-V 2016
    What's new in Hyper-V 2016
  • Microsoft Azure
    Microsoft Azure
Veeam Backup for Microsoft Office 365

Veeam Backup for Microsoft Office 365

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Some weeks ago Veeam announced Veeam Backup for Microsoft Office 365 and now you can finally download the Beta of it. To be honest with you the installation is brutally boring and simple, so I will only show you how you quickly can create a new backup job.

First create a new job

Veeam Backup for Microsoft Office 365 New Backup Job

Select a which mailboxes you want to backup

Veeam Backup for Microsoft Office 365 New Backup Job Select Mailboxes

configure schedule and retention and you are ready to go

Veeam Backup for Microsoft Office 365 New Backup Job Schedule

And guest what, with the Veeam Explorer for Microsoft Exchange, you can also restore mails from your Office 365 mailboxes.

Veeam Explorer for Microsoft Exchange

Check out the Veeam Backup for Microsoft Office 365 here.

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Windows Azure Pack Version PowerShell

Verify installed Windows Azure Pack version

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If you want to check which version of Windows Azure Pack is installed or if you want to find out which Update Rollup of Windows Azure Pack is installed you can simply do this using two ways.

You can check the version of the installed Windows Azure Pack components on each server, using the Control Panel – Programs and it shows you the installed components:

Windows Azure Pack Version

You can also use the following PowerShell command to check the installed Windows Azure Pack server

Windows Azure Pack Version PowerShell

You can now compare the version numbers in this list an you can see which Windows Azure Pack Update Rollup is installed. Every component on every sever has to be checked.

Windows Azure Pack (links to KB articles) Version number Build Date
Update Rollup 10 3.33.8196.14 04/20/2016
Security Update Rollup 9.1 3.32.8196.12 3/2/2016
Update Rollup 8.1 3.29.8196.0 11/16/2015
Update Rollup 8 3.28.8196.48 10/28/2015
Update Rollup 7.1 3.27.8196.3 8/25/2015
Update Rollup 7 3.25.8196.75 7/31/2015
Update Rollup 6 3.24.8196.35 4/28/2015
Update Rollup 5 3.22.8196.48 2/10/2015
Update Rollup 4 3.19.8196.21 10/21/2014
Update Rollup 3 3.15.8196.48 7/22/2014
Update Rollup 2 3.14.8196.32 4/16/2014
Update Rollup 1 3.12.8198.0 1/20/2014
RTM release 3.10.8198.9 9/16/2013

If you need more information please check the following Microsoft TechNet article: Install Windows Azure Pack updates and verify versions

Thanks to Fulvio Ferrarini (itnetX) which helped me with this blog post.

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Hyper-V Nano Server Console

How to deploy Nano Server

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Two weeks Microsoft released Windows Server 2016 and with that the first version of Nano Server. Now in this blog post I want to quickly show you how you can deploy Nano Server in Virtual Machines or on Physical Servers. Nano Server is following the zero-footprint model, so know roles and features as well as no drivers are included by default. With this you always have to create a new Nano Server Image and include the physical drivers or the virtual machine drivers and of course the roles and features.

To create new Nano Server Images you have basically two options, you can choose between the Nano Server Image Generator PowerShell module or the Nano Server Image Builder UI tool. With both you can create VHD, VHDX and WIM files which can be used to deploy Nano Server.

Create a Nano Server Image using the Nano Server Image Generator PowerShell module

New-NanoServerImage

This is the built in PowerShell module which can be found on the Windows Server 2016 media in the Nano Server folder.

  • MediaPath – The location with the Windows Server 2016 files
  • BasePath – Temporary folder to mount the WIM file
  • TargetPath – Where the new Image file gets stored. You can create a .wim, .vhd or .vhdx file
    • .vhd creates a Image for a Generation 1 VM (BIOS boot)
    • .vhdx create a Image for a Generation 2 VM (UEFI boot)
  • DeploymentType allows you to choose between Guest and Host
    • Guest creates a Virtual Machine
    • Host creates a Physical Image
  • Edition can be Standard or Datacenter
  • ComputerName adds the server name of the Nano Server
  • MaxSize changes the Partition size, if you are not using this parameter it will create a default partition of 4GB

If you want to know more about the option to Create a Nano Server Image using PowerShell blog post

Create a Nano Server Image using the Nano Server Image Builder

Nano Server Image Builder

The Nano Server Image Builder can help you with the following tasks:

  • Graphical UI to create Nano Server Images
  • Adding drivers
  • Choose Windows Server Edition
  • Adding roles and features
  • Adding drivers
  • Adding updates
  • Configuration of Network Settings
  • Configuration of Domain settings
  • Set Remoting Options
  • Create an ISO file to boot from DVD or BMC (remote connection like HP ILO)

First download and install the Windows Assessment and Deployment Kit (ADK) and the Nano Server Image Builder.

Set more options, choose packages (roles and feature), drivers and more.

Nano Server Packages and Drivers

If you want to know more about this deployment option check out my blog post about How to create a Nano Server Image using the Nano Server Image Builder.

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Installation Windows Server 2016 VPN

How to Install VPN on Windows Server 2016

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This post shows you how you can install a VPN Server on Windows Server 2016 Step-by-Step. It shows you how you can easily setup a VPN server for a small environment or for a hosted server scenario.

This is definitely not a guide for an enterprise deployment, if you are thinking about a enterprise deployment you should definitely have a look at Direct Access.

I already did similar blog posts for Windows Server 2008 R2, Windows Server 2012 and Windows Server 2012 R2.

You can simply follow this step by step guide:

First install the “Remote Access” via Server Manager or Windows PowerShell.

Install Remote Access Role VPN

Select the “DirectAccess and VPN (RAS)” role services and click next.

DirectAccess and VPN (RAS)

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Geekmania

Speaking at Geekmania 2016

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Today I can announce that I will speak at Geekmania 2016 at Friday 04.11.2016 at the Pathé Dietlikon. I this is the 4th time I am speaking at Geekmania, which is a one day event in Switzerland focusing on real world IT topics and Microsoft technologies.

Marcel Zehner from itnetX and me will speak in several different sessions about Windows Server 2016, System Center 2016, Microsoft OMS and Microsoft Azure Stack.

What's new in Windows Server 2016 Hyper-V

With the next version of Microsoft hypervisor Microsoft released some great new features for your Cloud infrastructure. Come to this session to get the details of all the new stuff that is in Hyper-V and learn about how you can play with it “hands-on.” This session includes also the latest updates from the GA Release.

What’s new in Windows Server 2016 Storage

With the next version of Microsoft hypervisor Microsoft released some great new features for your Cloud infrastructure. Microsoft announced several new feature on Windows Server 2016 including a lot of new Storage features, such as Storage Spaces Direct, ReFS, Storage Replica and much more. In this session you get an overview about the new Storage technologies in Windows Server 2016 and Hyper-V.

Microsoft Azure Stack - Azure for your Datacenter

Get more information about Microsoft Azure Stack and how you can get Azure for your Datacenter.

I hope I see you there!

 

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Nano Server Image Builder

Create a Nano Server using the Nano Server Image Builder

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Last week Microsoft released Windows Server 2016 to the public and at the weekend Microsoft released the Nano Server Image Builder. I already wrote a few blog posts how you can create new Nano Server Images using PowerShell. The Nano Server Image Builder is a UI based wizard to create new Nano Server Images. The Nano Server Image Builder helps you create a custom Nano Server image and bootable USB media with a graphical interface. Based on the inputs you provide, it generates images for deployment and it also creates reusable PowerShell scripts that allow you to create installations of Nano Server.

The Nano Server Image Builder can help you with the following tasks:

  • Graphical UI to create Nano Server Images
  • Adding drivers
  • Choose Windows Server Edition
  • Adding roles and features
  • Adding drivers
  • Adding updates
  • Configuration of Network Settings
  • Configuration of Domain settings
  • Set Remoting Options
  • Create an ISO file to boot from DVD or BMC (remote connection like HP ILO)

First download and install the Windows Assessment and Deployment Kit (ADK) and the Nano Server Image Builder.

I will not go trough all the options but here is just quickly how you can use it.

First create a new Nano Server Image (this can be a VHD, VHDX or WIM file. If you want to use it on a USB drive or ISO save it as a WIM file)

Nano Server Image Builder

Make sure you have prepared everything like the Windows Server 2016 files and drivers etc

Prepapre Nano Server Files

Select the Windows Server 2016 source

Nano Server Sources

Set more options, choose packages (roles and feature), drivers and more.

Nano Server Packages and Drivers

You can also configure some advanced options

Nano Server Image Builder Advanced Configuration

You can now create the Nano Server Image. The Nano Server Image Builder will also show you the PowerShell command to create more Nano Servers.

Nano Server Image Builder PowerShell Creation

You can also use this tool to create a bootable USB drive or ISO using an existing Nano Server Image.

Select the Nano Server Image you have already created

Nano Server Image Builder WIM file

As an option you can also create a ISO file

Nano Server Image ISO

 

You can now boot from USB drive or ISO and you can get the following WinPE Image to boot and this copies the Nano Server Image to the server

Nano Server WinPe

If you want to know more, check out the blog post from Scott Johnson (Microsoft): Introducing the Nano Server Image Builder

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New-NanoServerImage

How to create a Nano Server Image using PowerShell

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Last week Microsoft released Windows Server 2016 with the first GA release of Nano Server. A couple of months back I already wrote a blog post how you can create a new Nano Server Image in Technical Preview 4. This post is an updated version of that this post using Windows Server 2016 GA. In this post I will quickly show you how you can create a new VHD, VHDX or WIM file with your Nano Server configuration.

This is the PowerShell option, you can also use the Nano Server Image Builder.

First you have to download the latest Windows Server 2016 ISO file.

NanoServer Folder

If you open the Windows Server 2016 ISO file you can see a folder called “NanoServer” on the medium. This folder includes:

  • NanoServer.wim – This is the Nano Server Image file
  • Packages – The Package folder includes the Nano Server Packages, Windows Roles and Features and some basic drivers
  • NanoServerImageGenerator – In this folder you can find the Nano Server Image Generator PowerShell Module

I usually create a folder on my C:\NanoServer to store all the things I need, which makes things a little simpler.

Create Nano Server Image Folder

  • Base – This is a temporary folder where the images get mounted while updating or creating new images
  • Drivers – This is the folder where I copy all the drivers for a physical image
  • Files – This is the unpacked Windows Server 2016 ISO image (including, the sources folder, NanoServer folder, support, boot and efi folder as well as the setup.exe file)
  • Images – In this folder I store all the new created images
  • Updates – In this folder I store the Windows Server 2016 Update cumulative updates (.cab files)
  • XMLs – In this folder I store unattend.xml files if I need to do a extended configuration.

Of course you don’t have to use this folder structure, but it makes things easier.

If you have a look at the Packages folder you can find all the available packages for Nano Server:

Nano Server Packages

A new Nano Server Image can be created using the New-NanoServerImage PowerShell cmdlet. This will create a new Nano Server Image in a VHDX including the VM Guest drivers and nothing more.

New-NanoServerImage

  • MediaPath – The location with the Windows Server 2016 files
  • BasePath – Temporary folder to mount the WIM file
  • TargetPath – Where the new Image file gets stored. You can create a .wim, .vhd or .vhdx file
    • .vhd creates a Image for a Generation 1 VM (BIOS boot)
    • .vhdx create a Image for a Generation 2 VM (UEFI boot)
  • DeploymentType allows you to choose between Guest and Host
    • Guest creates a Virtual Machine
    • Host creates a Physical Image
  • Edition can be Standard or Datacenter
  • ComputerName adds the server name of the Nano Server
  • MaxSize changes the Partition size, if you are not using this parameter it will create a default partition of 4GB

Hyper-V NanoServer VHDX

You can now copy the VHDX file from the Images folder, attach this to a new Hyper-V virtual machine and boot.

This will show the Nano Server recovery console:

Hyper-V Nano Server Console

There are more parameters to add roles and features, updates, drivers and additional configuration like IP addresses and more

For example if you want to add some updates to the Nano Server Image you can use the following cmdlet:

To add a fixed IP address you can for example use the following cmdlet:

If you have some advanced deployment you can use for example the following thing, which helps you to set different configuration options. This example here is designed for a physical Hyper-V host

You can for example use this VHDX file now to create a boot from VHDX scenario:

I hope this helps you to get started with Nano Server in Windows Server 2016. I also prepared a blog post how you can create a Nano Server Image using the Nano Server Image Builder tool.

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