Tag: Table

How to Configure Azure CLI Default Output

How to Configure Azure CLI Default Output Format

The Azure command-line interface (Azure CLI) is a set of commands used to create and manage Azure resources. In this blog post, I am going to show you how you can configure the Azure CLI default output format.

If you have used the Azure resources on your machine or in Azure Cloud Shell, you are aware that if you are running a command, the output you get is in the JSON format. This is great if you are building some sort of automation. However, if you are using in in the command line, it might not be the best way to read the output. You can change the output by using --output table or -o table to make it more human-readable.

To install the Azure CLI check out my blog post here.

How to Configure Azure CLI Default Output

You can also configure the Azure CLI default output to always be a specific type like the table format by running the az configure command. The Azure CLI allows for user configuration for settings such as logging, data collection, output format, and default argument values. You can learn more about the Azure CLI configuration on Microsoft Docs.

Azure CLI az configure

Azure CLI az configure

With az configure, you can manage Azure CLI configuration with this command is interactive.

Azure CLI az configure default output

Azure CLI az configure default output

Here you can now change the default output format.

Azure CLI Tip – Use AI to find az commands
If you did use the Azure CLI, you might find this tip very handy. I am talking about the az find command. The az find command provides you with example commands based on Azure documentation and usage patterns of the Azure CLI and Azure Resource Manager users.

Conclusion

I hope this blog post shows you how to configure the Azure CLI default output format. Are you just getting started with the Azure CLI and want some introduction, check out the get started with Azure CLI Microsoft Docs page. If you have any questions let me know in the comments.



Azure Storage Explorer

Microsoft quietly released Azure Storage Explorer 1.0.0

Microsoft quietly released Azure Storage Explorer 1.0.0 back in April. There was not a lot of noise about it, but it is great that this tool finally reached version 1.0. Azure Storage Explorer is a standalone app that enables you to easily work with Azure Storage data on Windows, macOS, and Linux. This works with Azure as well as Microsoft Azure Stack.

Azure Storage Explorer is an easy to use tool to manage Azure Storage types:

  • Access multiple accounts and subscriptions across Azure, Azure Stack, and the sovereign Cloud
  • Create, delete, view, and edit storage resources
  • View and edit Blob, Queue, Table, File, Cosmos DB storage and Data Lake Storage
  • Obtain shared access signature (SAS) keys
  • Available for Windows, Mac, and Linux

Version 1.0.0 brings some new features which were highly requested. Especially the shared account store with Visual Studio 2017 and the improved Azure Stack  integration are very welcome.

  • Enhanced authentication that allows Storage Explorer to use the same account store as Visual Studio 2017. To use this feature, you will need to re-login to your accounts and re-set your filtered subscriptions.
  • For Azure Stack accounts backed by AAD, Storage Explorer will now retrieve Azure Stack subscriptions when ‘Target Azure Stack’ is enabled. You no longer need to create a custom login environment.
  • Several shortcuts were added to enable faster navigation. These include toggling various panels and moving between editors. See the View menu for more details.
  • Storage Explorer feedback now lives on GitHub. You can reach our issues page by clicking the Feedback button in the bottom left or by going to https://github.com/Microsoft/AzureStorageExplorer/issues. Feel free to make suggestions, report issues, ask questions, or leave any other form of feedback.
  • If you are running into SSL Certificate issues and are unable to find the offending certificate, you can now launch Storage Explorer from the command line with the –ignore-certificate-errors flag. When launched with this flag, Storage Explorer will ignore SSL certificate errors.
  • There is now a ‘Download’ option in the context menu for blob and file items.
  • Improved accessibility and screen reader support. If you rely on accessibility features, see our accessibility documentation for more information.
  • Storage Explorer now uses Electron 1.8.3