Tag: Linux Subsystem

Hyper-V Windows Containers

Windows Server news from Microsoft Build 2017 – It is all about Container!

Microsoft is just running their annual Developer Conference call Build with some interesting news for developers on Azure, Database Servers, Visual Studio, PowerShell, .NET and much more. But Microsoft also had some interesting things to share about the future of Windows Server. In a blog post, Erin Chapple, General Manager Windows Server, shared some information what Microsoft is doing in the Windows server space and about the next first feature release which will be aligned with the Windows 10 Client Operating System and will be released this Fall.

Windows Server is joining the Windows Insider program – Microsoft will start releasing regular Windows Server Insider builds including container images, which will be available to all Windows Insiders.

Container-optimized Nano Server – The Windows Server team has closely partnered with he .NET Team to bring the .NET Core 2.0 work to Windows Containers with an optimized container image based on Nano Server. This will reduce the footprint of the .NET container image by 50 percent, which will also reduce startup time as well as density improvements.

Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL) on Windows Server – At DockerCon Keynote we demonstrated a Linux container running natively on Windows Server. To enable this, the Windows Server team worked to bring the Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL), also know as bash on Windows 10, to Windows Server. Together with Hyper-V isolation technology, the WSL will allow users to run Linux Containers on a Windows Server Container Host. The great thing here, there is also a choice on the Linux kernel, which will allow you to run different Linux distributions as containers.

Container Orchestration – Microsoft works with different container orchestration technologies, such as Docker swarm and Kubernetes to bring support for Windows Server Containers.

Container Storage – In Windows Containers you could use locally mounted volumes to store persistent data. As another investment in Containers, Microsoft is adding the ability to map SMB file-based storage directly into a container.

Starting this summer, Microsoft will begin to post early builds of the new Windows Server features, including container-optimized Nano Server images to the Docker Hub, support for Linux containers, Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL), better orchestration support and SMB storage for containers in the Windows Insider program.

Aligned with the next release of Windows 10, these new features will be delivered as part of our first feature release this Fall. It will be available to customers with Software Assurance who commit to a more frequent release model. For customers who prefer the long-term servicing branch (LTSB) these features will be part of the next major release of Windows Server.



Bash on Windows 10

How to Install Linux Bash on Windows 10

With the Windows 10 Anniversary Update, which was released by Microsoft in Summer 2016, Microsoft included a Windows Subsystem for Linux in Windows 10. This allows you to enable Linux Bash on Windows 10. In this blog post I quickly want to show how you can enable the Windows Subsystem for Linux on Windows 10. This is great if you want to use some Linux tools on your Windows 10 machine. I use it for example to use SSH to connect to Linux Virtual Machines on Azure.

First you have the following requirements:

  • Windows 10 Anniversary Update – Windows 10 Build 14393 and higher
  • 64-bit versions of Windows 10
  • Internet Connection to download the Windows Subsystem for Linux in Windows
  • Active Developer Mode in Windows 10

First enable Developer Mode There are two option you can do this

Open the Settings App, go to Update & Security, go to For developers and enable Developer mode:

Windows 10 - Developer Mode

You can also use the following PowerShell command to enable Developer Mode:

 
reg add "HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\AppModelUnlock" /t REG_DWORD /f /v "AllowDevelopmentWithoutDevLicense" /d "1"

After this you can enable the Windows Subsystem for Linux as a Windows Feature in the Control Panel or PowerShell

Windows 10 - Windows Subsystem for Linux

Run the following PowerShell command to enable the Windows Subsystem for Linux:

Enable Windows Subsystem for Linux using PowerShell

 
Enable-WindowsOptionalFeature -Online -FeatureName Microsoft-Windows-Subsystem-Linux

After that you will need to restart your computer.

Now you can open up PowerShell or the command prompt and start using bash. (You can also start Bash directly from the Start Menu)

Bash on Windows 10

Hope this helps you to get started.