Tag: enable

Surface Pro X with Slim Pen

How to Enable or Disable Hibernate on the Surface Pro X

I am sure you have seen that I am the proud owner of a Surface Pro X. The Surface Pro X is one of the latest Microsoft Surface devices, and instead of coming with an Intel or AMD x86 processor, it comes with a custom Qualcomm ARM CPU, called the Microsoft SQ1. The Surface Surface Pro X also runs Windows 10 on ARM, which allows you to run ARM64 and emulated x86 (32-bit) apps. Since I really like this device and the always-on feature, I just quickly want to share how you can enable or disable hibernate on the Surface Pro X.

The reason why I want to disable hibernate is that I can take advantage of the always-on capabilities for a much longer period of time. To understand the differences between shut down, sleep, or hibernate, you can check out the following Microsoft support article.

Shut down, sleep, or hibernate your PC and the Surface Pro X

There are different ways of handling your PC when you are not using it, you can turn your PC off completely by shutting it down, make it sleep, or you can hibernate your PC.

Sleep

Sleep uses very little power, your PC starts up faster, and you’re instantly back to where you left off. You don’t have to worry that you’ll lose your work because of your battery draining, because Windows automatically saves all your work and turns off the PC if the battery is too low. Use sleep when you’re going to be away from your PC for just a little while—like when you’re taking a coffee break.

Hibernate

This option was designed for laptops and might not be available for all PCs. Hibernate uses less power than sleep and when you start up the PC again, you’re back to where you left off (though not as fast as sleep). Use hibernation when you know that you won’t use your laptop or tablet for an extended period and won’t have an opportunity to charge the battery during that time. First check to see if this option is available on your PC and if it is, turn it on.

(Source Microsoft Support)

Enable or Disable Hibernate on the Surface Pro X

To enable or disable hibernate you can use the following options by using PowerShell or the Command Prompt as administrator.

Disable Hibernate run:

powercfg.exe /hibernate off

Enable Hibernate run:

powercfg.exe /hibernate on

You can also find out more about the battery behavior of your Windows 10 devices by using powercfg, so you can see how much battery power your devices uses in sleep or hibernation or while using it. I wrote a blog post called Troubleshoot Windows 10 Battery Life and Modern Standby.

Windows 10 SleepStudy Report

Windows 10 SleepStudy Report

I hope this post helps a couple of people dealing with the power management of Windows 10 and how to enable or disable hibernate on the Surface Pro X. If you have any questions, feel free to leave a comment.



Windows Server

Configure CSV Cache in Windows Server 2012 R2

In Windows Server 2012 Microsoft introduced CSV Cache for Windows Server 2012 Hyper-V and Scale-Out File Server Clusters. The CSV Block Cache is basically a RAM cache which allows you to cache read IOPS in the Memory of the Hyper-V or the Scale-Out File Server Cluster nodes. In Windows Server 2012 you had to set the CSV Block Cache and enable it on every CSV volume. In Windows Server 2012 R2 CSV Block cache is by default enabled for every CSV volume but the size of the CSV Cache is set to zero, which means the only thing you have to do is to set the size of the cache.

 
# Get CSV Block Cache Size
(Get-Cluster).BlockCacheSize
# Set CSV Block Cache Size to 512MB
(Get-Cluster).BlockCacheSize = 512

Microsoft recommends using 512MB as cache on a Hyper-V host. On a Scale-Out File Server node, things are a little bit different. In Windows Server 2012 Microsoft allowed you to use a cache size up to 20% of the server, in Windows Server 2012 R2 Microsoft changed this, so you can now finally use up to 80% of the RAM of a Scale-Out File Server but with a maximum of 64GB.

Back in the days of Windows Server 2012 I made a little benchmark of CSV Cache on my Hyper-V hosts.



VMware ESXi vSphere Client Start SSH Service

Enable SSH on VMware ESXi 5.5 via vSphere Client

For remote troubleshooting or other stuff, you can enable SSH on your VMware ESXi 5.5 host. You can do this on the VMware ESXi host itself or you can do this directly from the VMware vSphere Client.

On the vSphere Client click on the configuration tab

VMware ESXi vSphere Client Configuration

Click on Security Profile

VMware ESXi vSphere Client Security Profile

Now open the Properties tab so you cen see the Security Profile properties and the Remote Access services.

VMware ESXi vSphere Client Security Profile Properies

Select the SSH Service and click on Options. This will open up a new Windows where you can start the SSH service for your VMware ESXi 5.5 host and also set the startup properties for the service.

VMware ESXi vSphere Client Start SSH Service

Now you should be able to access your VMware vSphere ESXi host via SSH. If you have any problems to connect you should also check out the firewall of your ESXi server.

VMware ESXi 5.5 Firewall

If you want to enable SSH on directly on your VMware ESXi host check out the following post: Enable SSH on VMware ESXi 5.5

If you are running Windows, you should also check out my blog post about how to install SSH on Windows 10 or SSH on Windows Server. I also blogged about how you can use SSH with PowerShell.



Activated SSH on ESXi 4.1

In VMware ESXi 4.0 you needed a small a trick to activated SSH on your Host. In VMware ESXi 4.1 its very easy to activate SSH.

  1. Press F2 to Customize System Settings
  2. VMware ESXi 4.1 Navigate to Troubleshooting Options
    VMware ESXi 4.1 Troubleshooting Options
  3. Now you can enable Remote Tech Support (SSH)
    VMware ESXi 4.1 enable SSHVMware ESXi 4.1 enable SSH

And by the way, installing ESXi in VMware Fusion on my Mac is really awesome for presentation and testing.

Here is a link how you do this with VMware ESXi 4.0