Tag: Browser

Mastering Azure with Cloud Shell

Mastering Azure with Cloud Shell

There are multiple ways to interact and manage resources in Microsoft Azure. You can use the Azure Portal or command line tools like the Azure PowerShell module or the Azure CLI, which you can install on your local machine. However, to set up a cloud management workstation for administrators and developers can be quite a lot of work. Especially if you have multiple machines, keeping consistency between these machines can be challenging. Another challenge is keeping the environment secure and all the tools up to date. This any many more things are addressed by the Cloud Shell.

Cloud Shell is not brand new, Microsoft announced Cloud Shell at Build 2017. This blog post is about how you can master Azure with Cloud Shell and to give you an overview about the possibilities of Cloud Shell.

What is Cloud Shell

Cloud Shell Azure Portal

Cloud Shell offers a browser-accessible, pre-configured shell experience for managing Azure resources without the overhead of installing, versioning, and maintaining a machine yourself. Azure Cloud Shell is assigned per unique user account and automatically authenticated with each session. This makes it a private and secure environment.

You get a modern web-based command line experience which can be accessed from several end points like the Azure Portal, shell.azure.com and the Azure mobile app, Visual Studio Code or directly in the Azure docs.

In the backend Azure uses containers and automatically attaches an Azure File Share to the container. You can store the data on it, so your data is persistent. This persist your data across different Cloud Shell sessions.

Cloud Shell Bash and PowerShell

You can choose your preferred shell experience. Cloud Shell supports Bash and PowerShell and included your favorite third party tools and common tools and languages. If something like a module is missing, you can simply add it.



Microsoft Edge Windows Defender Application Guard

Enable Windows Defender Application Guard on Windows 10 using PowerShell

A couple of days back I saw a tweet form Stefan Stranger (Consultant at Microsoft) which reminded me of a feature called Windows Defender Application Guard, which is included in Windows 10 Enterprise since the Fall Creators Update (1709). If you have never heard of Application Guard, you might want to check out this blog post: Introducing Windows Defender Application Guard for Microsoft Edge

Basically Windows Defender Application Guard starts Microsoft Edge in a Hyper-V Container and uses Hyper-V isolation. So if a user browses on a malicious site, the site is separate from the host operating system.

Application Guard Hardware Isolation

What is Windows Defender Application Guard and how does it work?
Designed for Windows 10 and Microsoft Edge, Application Guard helps to isolate enterprise-defined untrusted sites, protecting your company while your employees browse the Internet. As an enterprise administrator, you define what is among trusted web sites, cloud resources, and internal networks. Everything not on your list is considered untrusted.

If an employee goes to an untrusted site through either Microsoft Edge or Internet Explorer, Microsoft Edge opens the site in an isolated Hyper-V-enabled container, which is separate from the host operating system. This container isolation means that if the untrusted site turns out to be malicious, the host PC is protected, and the attacker can’t get to your enterprise data. For example, this approach makes the isolated container anonymous, so an attacker can’t get to your employee’s enterprise credentials.

Source: Windows Defender Application Guard overview

Usually Windows Defender Application Guard is configured using a Enterprise devices management tool like System Center Configuration Manager, Microsoft Intune or another third-party tool. But if you want to use this on your standalone Windows 10 PC you can also do this using PowerShell.

The only thing you need to run this is:

  • Windows 10 Enterprise 1709 (Fall Creators Update) or higher
  • A computer which supports Hyper-V
    • A 64-bit computer with minimum 4 cores is required for hypervisor and virtualization-based security (VBS)
    • Extended page tables, also called Second Level Address Translation (SLAT)
    • One of the following virtualization extensions for VBS:
      • Intel VT-x
      • AMD-V
    • Microsoft recommends 8GB RAM for optimal performance
    • 5 GB free space, solid state disk (SSD) recommended
    • Input/Output Memory Management Unit (IOMMU) support is strongly recommended
  •  Microsoft Edge and Internet Explorer

Enable Windows Defender Application Guard using PowerShell

You can simply install Application Guard using the following command:

New Application Guard Windows in Microsoft Edge

This will reboot your computer and after this you will be able to open a new Microsoft Edge windows in Application Guard.

Microsoft Edge Windows Defender Application Guard

This does added some extra security, however it does not really protect against like the Meltdown and Spectre attacks.

Application Guard Virtual Machine Worker Process

If you have a look at the processes running on your computer you can now see that there is a new Virtual Machine Worker Process which is used by the Application Guard.

This is a great example how the Hyper-V isolation can not only be used for Hyper-V Virtual Machines but also other features like Hyper-V Containers or for example on the Xbox One.