Tag: Battery

Windows 10 SleepStudy Report

Troubleshoot Windows 10 Battery Life and Modern Standby

More and more mobile devices are out there, and Windows 10 has some need features like Modern Standby, formerly known as InstantGo or Connected Standby. Modern Standby provides an instant on/instant off user experience that users expect to have with their phones. Devices like the Surface Pro, Surface Go, and Surface Book 2 are using Modern Standby. Now that said there are always scenarios where battery life or standby doesn’t work as we wish. This blog post should help to troubleshoot Windows 10 battery life and modern standby on Windows 10, using inbox tools. For example, “powercfg”, which allows you to create Windows 10 battery reports.

Check hardware support for standby modes

Powercfg information

First of all, you can check with power states, standby modes, or the available sleep states supported by your hardware using the following command:

powercfg /a

General Windows 10 Battery life and standby issues

In some case, you can run in some issues where you have your battery draining more than expected during the Modern Standby time. This could be of the following reasons:

  • Drivers – Make sure you have the latest drivers installed
  • Firmware – Make sure you have the latest Firmware (BIOS) installed
  • Mails –  The Windows communication app keeps the broker infrastructure (BI) system active. BI, in turn, keeps the WLAN network up so that the system stays up-to-date with emails. If you get a lot of emails, this can end up in a higher power drain.
  • Software –  Some installed legacy Software which does not let you go into the InstantGo modus.
  • VPN Clients – Some older VPN Clients can also cause issues with InstantGo
  • Network Activity – The WLAN device might have a challenging radio environment, and the Windows system might not be able to establish a reliable Internet connection. We see how these events affect the WLAN device, which, in turn, impacts the battery.


Hyper-V VM battery

Hyper-V gets Virtual Battery support

Last week Microsoft announced Windows 10 Insider Preview build 16215 which added a lot of new features to Windows 10. With Windows 8 Microsoft brought Hyper-V to the Windows Client Operating System, and with the Windows 10 Insider Program we can also see some Hyper-V preview features coming to live. Previously we could see feature like Nested Virtualization and more in the Windows client builds before we seen them in the server releases. With Windows 10 Insider Preview build 16215, Hyper-V gets virtual battery support, which means you can now see your machine’s battery state in your VMs. This is especially handy if you run Virtual Machines on your notebook. My guess would be, that this could also be used on server for battery support and automatic shutdown.

To enable the feature inside the Virtual Machine you have to create a Prerelease Virtual Machine using PowerShell.

Hyper-V Prerelease Virtual Machine

You can use the following PowerShell command to create a Prerelease Virtual Machine. Please remind yourself that prerelease virtual machines are not supported in production and may fail across updates.

New-VM -Name "Windows10" -MemoryStartupBytes 2048MB -NewVHDPath C:\VMs\Windows.vhdx -NewVHDSizeBytes 127GB -Generation 2 -Prerelease

You can now see that the Virtual Machine now has version number 254.0, which adds some hidden new features like virtual battery support.

Prerelease Virtual Machine Hyper-V Manager

My guess is that this could be available automatically per default in all virtual machines in the final version of the Windows 10 Fall Creators Update.



InstantGo powercfg

Troubleshoot Windows InstantGo (Connected Standby)

In Windows 8 Microsoft released a feature called InstantGo (formerly know as Connected Standby) which should bring smartphone like Power Management features to your Windows tablet or notebook. Devices such as the Surface Pro 3 do offer this feature. This post should help you troubleshoot issues with InstantGo or Connected Standby.

InstantGo requires the following:

  • Windows 8.1 Operating System (In Windows 8 this is called Connected Standby)
  • A firmware flag indicating support for the standard
  • The boot volume must run on a SSD disk
  • Support for NDIS 6.30 by all network devices
  • Passive cooling on standby
  • Secure Boot
  • Memory to be soldered to the motherboard
  • The Hyper-V Hypervisor role must be disabled on Windows 8 and Windows 8.1 systems. Windows 10 Hyper-V will allow you to use Hyper-V and InstantGo at the same time.

Check if the hardware supports InstantGo

To check if your hardware supports InstantGo you can run the following command:

 
powercfg /a

InstantGo powercfg

InstantGo Issues / Connected Standby Issues

In some case you can run in some issues where you have your battery draining more than expected during the InstantGo or Connected Standby time. This could be of the following reasons:

  • Drivers – Make sure you have the latest drivers installed
  • Firmware – Make sure you have the latest Firmware (BIOS) installed
  • Mails –  The Windows communication app keeps the broker infrastructure (BI) system active. BI, in turn, keeps the WLAN network up so that the system stays up-to-date with emails. If you get a lot of emails this can end up in a higher power drain.
  • Software –  Some installed legacy Software which does not let you go into the InstantGo modus.
  • VPN Clients – Some older VPN Clients can also cause issues with InstantGo
  • Network Activity – The WLAN device might have a challenging radio environment and the Windows system might not be able to establish a reliable Internet connection. We see how these events affect the WLAN device, which, in turn, impacts the battery.
  • Hyper-V – If you run Hyper-V in Windows 8 or Windows 8.1 you can not run InstantGo, this is solved in Windows 10.

Troubleshooting InstantGo / Troubleshooting Connected Standby

To get some more information about your device and InstantGo or Connected Standby you can use the following tools and reports.

powercfg /SleepStudy

Powercfg SleepStudy

The maybe best way to Troubleshoot Connected Standby or InstantGo issues, is to use the powercfg /SleepStudy command. This will generate a Sleep Study report which allows you to analyze different things about Conncted Standby:

Connected Standby / InstantGo Overview

SleepStudy Report

Connected Standby Transitions

SleepStudy Report Connected Standby Transitions

Connected Standby Sessions

Here you can analyze which application or driver did use battery resources during the Connected Standby session.

SleepStudy Report InstantGo

powercfg /batteryreport

powercfg batteryreport

With powercfg /batteryreport you can generate a report about how your battery is used.

Battery Report

And you can also see what kind of state drained your battery, if this was an active session or a Connected Standby session.

Battery Report Battery Usage

powercfg /energy

PowerCFG Engery

With powercfg /engery you can see not only InstantGo or Connected Standby issues, you can see what other applications, drivers and more does could drain your battery.

Energy Report

I hope this helps you to troubleshoot Connected Standby issues.

Sources