Tag: Windows Server 1709

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OpenSSH Server on Windows Server

Install OpenSSH Server on Windows Server

Back in 2017 Microsoft made OpenSSH available on Windows 10. Shorty after OpenSSH was also available for Windows Server, version 1709. This blog post should give you a simple step by step guy how you install OpenSSH Server on Windows Server. OpenSSH is available for Windows Server, version 1709 and higher. If you are running Windows Server 2016, and you want to stay in the long-term servicing branch, you will need to wait for the next Windows Server LTSC build.

Install OpenSSH Server on Windows Server

If you are running a Windows Server 1709 or higher, you can simply use PowerShell to install the OpenSSH Client and Server.

OpenSSH on Windows Server

You can use the following PowerShell commands to install the OpenSSH Server on Windows Server.

After the installation you can find the OpenSSH Server files and some more configuration options under “C:\Windows\System32\OpenSSH”

Next you need to configure the OpenSSH Server (sshd)

To enable authentication into an SSH server on Windows, you first have to generate host keys and repair the ACL on the host keys.

Configure OpenSSH Server on Windows

To configure the OpenSSH Server on Windows Server, just run the following PowerShell commands:

Now you should be able to access your Windows Server using an SSH client.

OpenSSH Server on Windows Server

Remember if you run your server in Microsoft Azure, you might also need to configure the Network Security Group to allow SSH Remoting on port 22.



Ubuntu on Windows Server using WSL

Install Windows Subsystem for Linux on Windows Server

In 2017 Microsoft made it possible to run different Linux distribution on Windows 10, using a feature called the “Windows Subsystem for Linux“. With the latest official Semi-Annual Channel Windows Server release called Windows Server, version 1709 Microsoft also allowed to run the Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL) on Windows Server. With the next release of Windows Server called Windows Server, version 1803, Microsoft will also add some improvements to the Windows Subsystem on Linux, which also apply to Windows 10 as well as Windows Server. This blog post shows you how you can do this.

First you have a Windows Server, version 1709 running. After that enable the Microsoft Windows Subsystem for Linux feature, running the following command (This will need a reboot)

You can download the appx packages for you favorite Linux distribution, this can be today:

  • Ubuntu
  • OpenSUSE
  • Suse Linux Enterprise Server

If you are running on Windows Server Core (which is highly likely), you can use the following command to download the Linux distributions.

You can then unpack the file:

Now you can open that folder and run the installer for example ubuntu.exe. The first time this will do the setup where you also define the UNIX username and password as well as the root password.

WSL on Windows Server

After that you can run updates for your distro and you can start using Linux.

If you want to know more about the WSL, check out the Microsoft Documentation: Windows Subsystem for Linux Documentation and have a look at my WSL post in for Windows 10: Crazy times – You can now run Linux on Windows 10 from the Windows Store



System Center

Microsoft released System Center 1801 Semi-Annual Channel

Microsoft just release the first Semi-Annual Channel release for System Center, called System Center, version 1801. This is the first release which now comes out to support the Windows Server Semi-Annual Channel releases like 1709 and also brings some new features and performance improvements.

System Center, version 1801 is the first of our Semi-Annual Channel releases delivering new capabilities at a faster cadence. Semi-Annual Channel releases have an 18-month support policy. In addition, we will continue to release in the Long-Term Servicing Channel (LTSC) at a lower frequency. The LTSC will continue to provide 5 years of mainstream support followed by 5 more years of extended support.

What’s in System Center, version 1801?

System Center, version 1801 focuses on enhancements and features for System Center Operations Manager, Virtual Machine Manager, and Data Protection Manager. Additionally, security and bug fixes, as well as support for TLS 1.2, are available for all System Center components including Orchestrator, Service Management Automation, and Service Manager.

I am pleased to share the capabilities included in this release:

 

  • Support for additional Windows Server features in Virtual Machine Manager: Customers can now setup nested virtualization, software load balancer configuration, and storage QoS configuration and policy, as well as migrate VMware UEFI VM to Hyper-V VM. In addition to supporting Windows Server, version 1709, we have added support for host monitoring, host management, fall back HGS, configuration of encrypted SDN virtual network, Shielded Linux VMs on Hyper-V management, and backup capabilities.
  • Linux monitoring in Operations Manager: Linux monitoring has been significantly improved with the addition of a customizable FluentD-based Linux agent. Linux log file monitoring is now on par with that of Windows Server (Yes, we heard you! Kick the tires, it really works).
  • Improved web console experience in Operations Manager: The System Center Operations Manager web console is now built on HTML5 for a better experience and support across browsers.
    Updates and recommendations for third-party Management Packs: System Center Operations Manager has been extended to support the discovery and update of third-party MPs.
  • Faster, cost-effective VMware backup: Using our Modern Backup Storage technology in Data Protection Manager, customers can backup VMware VMs faster and cut storage costs by up to 50%.
  • And much more including Linux Kerberos support and improved UI responsiveness when dealing with many management packs in Operations Manager. In Virtual Machine Manager, we have enabled SLB guest cluster floating IP support, added Storage QoS at VMM cloud, added Storage QoS extended to SAN storage, enabled Remote to VMs in Enhanced Session mode, added seamless update of non-domain host agent, and made host Refresher up to 10X faster.

You can get System Center, version 1801 from the Evaluation Center or the Volume Licensing Service Center.



Windows SSH on WSL

Install and Configure OpenSSH Server on Windows 10 and Windows Server 1709

A couple of weeks ago I already wrote about how OpenSSH is now available on Windows 10. In this blog post I will cover how to install and configure OpenSSH Server on Windows 10 and Windows Server 1709.

Today, OpenSSH Client and Server on Windows are still in Beta, so they should only be used in secure test environments and not in production.

First you have to install the OpenSSH feature on your Windows machine. Remember that it needs to be the Windows 10 Fall Creators Update (1709) or Windows Server version 1709 or higher.

Windows OpenSSH Server

On Windows 10 you can also use the UI to install it.

Windows OpenSSH Server Folder

After the installation you can find the OpenSSH Server files and some more configuration options under C:\Windows\System32\OpenSSH

Now you need to configure the OpenSSH Server (sshd)

To enable authentication into an SSH server on Windows, you first have to generate host keys and repair the ACL on the host keys.

Configure OpenSSH Server on Windows

Windows SSH on WSL

Now you should be able to connect to the Windows Machine using SSH for an SSH client. Of course this can be the OpenSSH client or the SSH client which comes with the Windows Subsystem for Linux on Windows 10.

Azure Network Security Group SSH

If you are running OpenSSH Server on a Windows 10 or Windows Server 1709 virtual machine in Microsoft Azure, don’t forget to also configure the Network Security Group (NSG) to allow SSH inbound access on port 22.

Also check out how you can do SSH from PowerShell: Using SSH with PowerShell



Windows Server 1709 Server Core Sconfig

How to install Windows Server 1709

Microsoft just released the new Windows Server version 1709 in the Semi-Annual Channel. This blog post is for beginners which want to do their first step setting up Windows Server Core.

First you boot your server or virtual machine form the Windows Server 1709 ISO file. and select which Operating System you want to install. You can choose between Windows Server Standard or Windows Server Datacenter. As you might see, there is only Server Core available. The Server with Desktop Experience or Full Server is only available in the LTSC (Long-Term Servicing Channel) in Windows Server 2016.

Windows Server 1709 Operating System

After accepting the license terms, you can choose the installation type. Even there is an upgrade option, you should choose Custom which will be a new install. Since an in-place upgrade from older Windows Server versions is not supported.

Windows Server 1709 Installation Type

Choose which drive you want to install and the partitioning you want to use

Windows Server 1709 Choose Disk

After that Windows Server will install itself, and reboot for a couple of times.

Windows Server 1709 Installation

After the installation is finished you have to set the default Administrator password.

Windows Server 1709 Admin Password

When you login for the first time, it runs the Windows command prompt with the common Windows commands, or you can run PowerShell, or if you need the magic key to the server core configuration you can run “sconfig” which allows you quickly to do configuration changes, install updates and more.

Windows Server 1709 Server Core Sconfig



Docker Windows Server Container Images

Docker Container Images for Windows Server 1709 and new tagging

Last week Microsoft announced new Windows Server 1709 and the new Windows Server 1709 container images. The new container images in Windows Server version 1709 are highly optimized, especially in size. So for example the new Nano Server Container Image in 1709 is 5x smaller than the Nano Server Container Image in Windows Server 2016.

Microsoft also made some changes to tagging which is interesting.

If you want to use the latest images of the container images based on the Windows Server 2016 (which is in the Long-Term Servicing Channel, LTSC) you just run:

This will give you the latest images of the Windows Server and Nano server container images. If you want to run a specific patch level of the Windows Server 2016 (LTSC)m images, you can run the following:

Docker Windows Server Container Images Size

If you want to use the new Windows Server 1709 container images from the Semi-Annual Channel you can run the following

and again you cans also add a specific base OS container image by using a KB number:

If you already tried out the new container images during the development using the insider images, they still existing:

However, I am not sure what the plan for the insider images is going forward.



How to run Docker Linux Container on Windows Server 1709

As mentioned Microsoft released the final version of Windows Server 1709 in the last week. Windows Server 1709 brings a couple of new improvements, especially in the container space. Microsoft and Docker are working on bringing Linux Container support to Windows Server, so you can now run Windows and Linux Container at the same time on a Windows Server Container Host running Windows Server 1709 or Windows 10 with the Fall Creators Update (1709).

In this post I want to show you how you setup up a Container Host to run Windows and Linux Containers at the same time using Docker.

Create Container Host Virtual Machine

Enable Nested Virtualization

If you run Docker on a physical server you can skip this step. If you want to run Docker Containers using Linux inside a Virtual Machine running on Hyper-V you should enable Nested Virtualization for the Container Host Virtual Machine. You can do this by running the following command:

if you want to do this on a Hyper-V Server in Azure, check out this post: How to setup Nested Virtualization in Microsoft Azure

Install Docker Enterprise Edition Preview on Windows Server 1709

First you have to install Docker Enterprise Edition Preview on your Windows Server 1709 container host. You can install the Docker EE preview using PowerShell package management, using the following commands:

As mentioned this is a preview version of Docker EE which enables a bunch of new features, to run Docker in production environments please use Docker EE 17.06.

Enable Docker Linux Containers on Windows

The preview Docker EE package includes a full LinuxKit system (13MB) for use when running Docker Linux containers. To enable this use the following command:

to disable it again use the following:

Run Linux Docker Container on Windows Server

Docker Ubuntu Container on Windows Server

Now you are able to run Linux Containers on Windows Server 1709.

for fun you can also run Nyancat!

Docker Nyan Cat on Windows Server

Things are still in preview, so don’t expect to work 100% 🙂