Tag: program

Microsoft FastTrack for Azure

Start your Cloud Project with Microsoft FastTrack for Azure

I often get asked by customers how they can get started with their projects on Microsoft Azure. They often need help and support for datacenter migrations, new cloud deployments, architectures, and much more. Now there are obviously two things to consider, first is the internal skilling, which is important to understand how Azure works and get a basic understanding, for that I recommend my blog post on how to get started learning Microsoft Azure and Cloud Computing. The second one is finding partners and people which can do consulting for you, and help you to get on the right track. One of the programs Microsoft is offering is FastTrack for Azure, which is provided free of charge. FastTrack for Azure is a technical enablement program that helps with rapid and effective design and deployment of cloud solutions. It includes tailored guidance from Azure engineers to provide proven practices and architectural guidance.

Azure FastTrack

Azure FastTrack

What is FastTrack for Azure?

Save time and implement your cloud solutions correctly and confidently with FastTrack for Azure, regardless of your level of cloud experience.
FastTrack for Azure is a technical enablement program for organizations with cloud projects that enables the rapid, effective design, and deployment of Azure solutions in the cloud. It includes tailored guidance from Azure engineers that leverages proven practices and architectural guides.

Why choose FastTrack for Azure?

Let’s have a look at why you should choose FastTrack for Azure. I already mentioned a couple of the benefits of working with the Azure FastTrack program, but there is more. The Azure FastTrack team can help when you want to move to the cloud quickly, supported by expert guidance from Azure engineers. Another great reason, which I see very often is that customers want to gain confidence that their cloud architecture and deployment will be resilient, secure, and well-governed. And last but not least, FastTrack is a great choice when you want to accelerate the deployment of Azure solutions.

What FastTrack for Azure will do for you:

  • Assess your technical architecture, gather deployment requirements, and provide you with personalized guidance.
  • Build your confidence and reduce risk with best practice design guides, reference architectures, and blueprints.
  • Collaborate with Azure engineers and partners to deploy your Azure solutions to production quickly and efficiently.

If you want to learn more about the FastTrack for Azure program, check out the official Microsoft page.



Simple Bean Machine program done in Powershell

Powershell Header

In the last article I posted the C++ Code for a simple Bean Machine output. Now I did the same in Powershell. I know this is not really a fantastic Powershell script, but its good to show others how things get done in Powershell.

Like in the C++ bean machine it works like this:

Bean MachineAnd the Output should look like this:

Bean Machine outputAnd here is how you do this in Powershell:

#Config
[int]$ballCount = 100
[array]$box = @(0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5)
[string]$line = " +-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-->"
[string]$numbers = " 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50"
[object]$random = New-Object System.Random
 
#count
for([int]$i = 0; $i -lt $ballCount; $i++){
[int]$counter = 0
 
for([int]$j = 0; $j -lt 5; $j++){
$leftorright = $random.next(0,2)
$counter = $counter + $leftorright
}
$box[$counter] = $box[$counter] + 1
}
 
#Output
Write-Host $numbers
Write-Host $line
for ([int]$t = 0; $t -lt 6; $t++){
[string]$Statusline = ""
for ([int]$u = 0; $u -lt $box[$t]; $u++){
[string]$Statusline += "#"
}
Write-Host $t "|" $Statusline $box[$t]
Write-Host $line
}


Simple C++ Bean machine program @KTSI

This is a simple Bean machine program done in C++ for KTSI.

This is how it works, you drop 100 balls and they fall in 6 different boxes.

Bean MachineAnd this is how the C++ output should look like:

Bean Machine outputAnd here is how its done:

#include <iostream>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <ctime>
 
using namespace std;
 
int main (int argc, char * const argv[]) {
 
 
	// initial
	int ballCount = 100;
	int box[6] = { 0, 0, 0, 0, 0 };
	string line = " +-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-->";
	string numbers = " 0     5     10     15     20     25     30     35     40     45     50";
	int leftorright = 0;
 
	// Need for Random Numbers
	srand ( time(NULL) );
 
	// Rund ballCount (100) zahl = rand() % 2;
	for (int i=0; i<ballCount; i++) {
			int counter = 0;
 
		for (int j=0; j<5; j++) {
			// left or right
			leftorright = rand() % 2;
			counter = counter + leftorright;
		}
		box[counter] = box[counter]++;
 
	}	
 
	// Output
	cout << numbers << endl << line << endl;
	for (int t=0; t<6; t++) {
		cout << t << " |";
		for (int u=0; u < box[t]; u++) {
			cout << "#";
		}
		cout << " " << box[t] << endl << line << endl;
	}
	return 0;
}

I also did this program in Powershell



Simple C++ rect2polar program @KTSI

This is another simple C++ program done for KTSI. This one converts rectangular to polar coordinates.

#include 
#include 
 
using namespace std;
 
void rect2polar(double &amp;value, double &amp;angle, double x, double y) {
    value = sqrt(pow(x, 2) + pow(y, 2));
    angle = 180 / M_PI * atan2(y,x);
}
 
int main(){
    double value;
    double angle;
    double x = 4;
    double y = 3;
 
    rect2polar(value, angle, x, y);
 
    cout &lt;&lt; "x = " &lt;&lt; x &lt;&lt; endl;
    cout &lt;&lt; "y = " &lt;&lt; y &lt;&lt; endl;
    cout &lt;&lt; "value = " &lt;&lt; value &lt;&lt; endl;
    cout &lt;&lt; "angle = " &lt;&lt; angle &lt;&lt; endl;
    //system("PAUSE");
    return 0;
}


Simple C++ dec2bin program @KTSI

This is a very simple dec2bin program done for KTSI.

#include 
#include 
#include 
 
using namespace std;
 
string dec2bin (int v) {
	if (v &gt; 255) {
		return "";
	}
	else { 
		string bin;
		int oneorzero;
		for(int i=8;i&gt;0;i--) {
			oneorzero = v % 2;
			if (oneorzero == 1) {
				bin = "1" + bin;
			}
			else {
				bin = "0" + bin;
			}
			v /= 2;
 
		}
 
	return bin;
 
	}
}
 
int main(){
    int v;
    do {
        cout &lt;&lt; "Wert(ende = -1) = "; if (!(cin &gt;&gt; v)) {
            return 0;
        }
        if (v &lt; 0) break;
        string s = dec2bin(v);
        cout &lt;&lt; s &lt;&lt; endl; //system("PAUSE"); } while(v &gt;= 0);
    cout &lt;&lt; "bye" &lt;&lt; endl;
    //system("PAUSE");
    return 0;
}


Simple C++ lottery program @KTSI

Here is a simple C++ lottery program done for the KTSI.

#include <iostream>
#include <cstdlib>
 
using namespace std;
 
int main (int argc, char * const argv[]) {
 
	int numberCount;
	int maxNumbers;
 
	cout << "Lottery Game" << endl << "=================================" << endl;
	cout << "How many Lottery Numbers = ";
	cin >> numberCount;
	cout << "from 1 to ? ";
	cin >> maxNumbers;
	cout << "You have chosen " << numberCount << " Lottery Numbers from 1 to " << maxNumbers << endl;
 
	int lotteryNumbers[numberCount];
	int i, j;
	bool newNumber;
 
	srand(0);
	for(i=0; i<numberCount; i++) // get numbers
	{
		do  
		{   // Check Random
			lotteryNumbers[i] = rand() % maxNumbers + 1;
			newNumber = true;
			for (j=0; j<i; j++)
			{  
				if (lotteryNumbers[j]==lotteryNumbers[i])
				{ // Check for existing numbers
					newNumber = false;
				}
			}
		} while (!newNumber);
	}
	for (i=0; i<numberCount; i++)
	{
		cout << lotteryNumbers[i] << " ";
	}
	cout << endl;
}