Tag: Delete

How to Manage Hyper-V VM Checkpoints with PowerShell

How to Manage Hyper-V VM Checkpoints with PowerShell

In this blog post we are going to have a look at how you can create, manage, apply, and remove VM Checkpoints in Hyper-V using PowerShell. Hyper-V virtual machine (VM) checkpoints are one of the great benefits of virtualization. Before Windows Server 2012 R2, they were known as virtual machine snapshots. VM Checkpoints in Hyper-V allow you to save the system state of a VM to a specific time and then revert back to that state if you need to. This is great if you are testing software and configuration changes, or if you have a demo environment, which you want to reset.

Hyper-V VM Checkpoint Types

Before we got on how you can manage Hyper-V VM Checkpoints with PowerShell, let me first explain the two different types. Since Windows Server 2016 and Windows 10, Hyper-V includes two types of checkpoints, Standard Checkpoints, and Production Checkpoints.

  • Standard Checkpoints: takes a snapshot of the virtual machine and virtual machine memory state at the time the checkpoint is initiated. A snapshot is not a full backup and can cause data consistency issues with systems that replicate data between different nodes such as Active Directory. Hyper-V only offered standard checkpoints (formerly called snapshots) prior to Windows 10.
  • Production Checkpoints: uses Volume Shadow Copy Service or File System Freeze on a Linux virtual machine to create a data-consistent backup of the virtual machine. No snapshot of the virtual machine memory state is taken.

You can set up these settings in Hyper-V Manager or in PowerShell.

Hyper-V VM Checkpoint Types

Hyper-V VM Checkpoint Types

If you are using PowerShell to configure Checkpoints for virtual machines these commands may help you.

Configure and set VM for Standard Checkpoints

Set-VM -Name "Windows10" -CheckpointType Standard

Set VM to Production Checkpoints, if the production checkpoint fails a Standard Checkpoint is created

 Set-VM -Name "Windows10" -CheckpointType Production

Set VM to only use Production Checkpoints

 Set-VM -Name "Windows10" -CheckpointType ProductionOnly

Disable VM Checkpoints for the Hyper-V virtual machine

 Set-VM -Name "Windows10" -CheckpointType Disabled

Managing Hyper-V VM Checkpoints using PowerShell

Create VM Checkpoints

You can create a new VM Checkpoint with PowerShell, you can round the following command:

Checkpoint-VM -Name "Windows10"

You can find more on the cmdlet on Microsoft Docs.

You can list the VM Checkpoints of a Hyper-V VM:

Get-VMCheckpoint -VMName "Windows10"
How to Manage Hyper-V VM Checkpoints with PowerShell

How to Manage Hyper-V VM Checkpoints with PowerShell

Applying Hyper-V VM checkpoints using PowerShell

If you want to revert your virtual machine state to a previous point-in-time, you can apply an existing checkpoint, using the following PowerShell command.

Restore-VMCheckpoint -Name "checkpoint name" -VMName "Windows10" -Confirm:$false

You can find more information about the cmdlet here.

Renaming checkpoints

To rename a checkpoint you can use the following command

Rename-VMCheckpoint -VMName "Windows10" -Name "Checkpointname" -NewName "MyNewCheckpointName"

Deleting checkpoints

You can also delete or remove a Hyper-V VM checkpoint with the following PowerShell command. This will merge the .avhdx files in the background.

Remove-VMCheckpoint -VMName "Windows10" -Name "Checkpointname"

Conclusion

I hope this blog post gives you a great overview on how you can manage, apply, restore, and remove Hyper-V VM Checkpoints using PowerShell. You can learn more about Hyper-V virtual machine checkpoints on Microsoft Docs. If you have any questions, feel free to leave a comment.



Remove a VPN connection in Windows 7

In Windows 7 you an create VPN connections for PPTP, L2TP or SSTP. To delete a connection you can not just right click and press delete. But it’s still very simple, but a lot of people can’t find where you can remove VPN connections, because it is a kind of hidden ;-).

  1. First open Network and Sharing Center
  2. Click Change Adpater Settings on the left side
    networkandsharingcenter
  3. Now you can see all connections and you can remove the VPN connection


PowerShell

PowerShell: How to export Windows Eventlogs with PowerShell

This is a little dirty Windows PowerShell script which exports or backups Windows Eventlogs. The script creates a .evt file which can be used with the Windows Eventlog Viewer.

# Config
$logFileName = "Application" # Add Name of the Logfile (System, Application, etc)
$path = "C:\temp\" # Add Path, needs to end with a backsplash
 
# do not edit
$exportFileName = $logFileName + (get-date -f yyyyMMdd) + ".evt"
$logFile = Get-WmiObject Win32_NTEventlogFile | Where-Object {$_.logfilename -eq $logFileName}
$logFile.backupeventlog($path + $exportFileName)

And with the next code it cleans up older exported Eventlogs.

# Deletes all .evt logfiles in $path
# Be careful, this script removes all files with the extension .evt not just the selfcreated logfiles
$Daysback = "-7"
 
$CurrentDate = Get-Date
$DatetoDelete = $CurrentDate.AddDays($Daysback)
Get-ChildItem $Path | Where-Object { ($_.LastWriteTime -lt $DatetoDelete) -and ($_.Extension -eq ".evt") } | Remove-Item

UPDATE: If you wanna clean the Eventlog after the export you can do that by using the Clear-Eventlog cmdlet. (Thanks to Michel from server-talk.eu)

Clear-Eventlog -LogName $logFileName

And here the whole “script”

# Config
$logFileName = "Application" # Add Name of the Logfile (System, Application, etc)
$path = "C:\temp\" # Add Path, needs to end with a backsplash
 
# do not edit
$exportFileName = $logFileName + (get-date -f yyyyMMdd) + ".evt"
$logFile = Get-WmiObject Win32_NTEventlogFile | Where-Object {$_.logfilename -eq $logFileName}
$logFile.backupeventlog($path + $exportFileName)
 
# Deletes all .evt logfiles in $path
# Be careful, this script removes all files with the extension .evt not just the selfcreated logfiles
$Daysback = "-7"
 
$CurrentDate = Get-Date
$DatetoDelete = $CurrentDate.AddDays($Daysback)
Get-ChildItem $Path | Where-Object { ($_.LastWriteTime -lt $DatetoDelete) -and ($_.Extension -eq ".evt") } | Remove-Item
Clear-Eventlog -LogName $logFileName

Also check out my blog post about deleting files older than a specific date using PowerShell.



PowerShell Delete Files older than

PowerShell: Delete Files older than

This is a simple PowerShell script which deletes Files older than some days. You can use it to cleanup old logfiles or other things. If you run the script the first time you can add the “-WhatIf” parameter after Remove-Item command. This example will use PowerShell to delete files older than 30 days.

# Delete all Files in C:\temp older than 30 day(s)
$Path = "C:\temp"
$Daysback = "-30"
 
$CurrentDate = Get-Date
$DatetoDelete = $CurrentDate.AddDays($Daysback)
Get-ChildItem $Path | Where-Object { $_.LastWriteTime -lt $DatetoDelete } | Remove-Item

If you need to delete files in subfolders too, you can use this script. This is the same script with the Get-Childitem parameter “-Recurse”.

# Delete all Files in C:\temp older than 30 day(s)
$Path = "C:\temp"
$Daysback = "-30"
 
$CurrentDate = Get-Date
$DatetoDelete = $CurrentDate.AddDays($Daysback)
Get-ChildItem $Path -Recurse ( | Where-Object { $_.LastWriteTime -lt $DatetoDelete } | Remove-Item

I hope this helps you and gives you a quick PowerShell code snipped to remove files older than a specific date using PowerShell. Also check out my PowerShell snipped to copy logfiles with date and content.