Tag: WSL

Windows Terminal Color Schemes -Themes

My Windows Terminal Color Schemes

The Windows Terminal became generally available at the Microsoft Build 2020 virtual conference a couple of weeks ago. I already blogged about how you can customize your Windows Terminal settings and shared my settings.json file. Many people asked me about the different Windows Terminal Color Schemes I use. So I thought a blog post would be a good way of sharing my Windows Terminal Schemes.

Windows Terminal 1.0 was released on May 19, you can find more documentation here on Microsoft Docs.

I already shared a couple of blog posts on how you can customize your Windows Terminal experience:

My Windows Terminal Color Schemes

Here is my Windows Terminal Color Schemes. Since I use the acrylic effect, I post a picture when the Windows Terminal window is active and one where it is inactive.

Vibrant Tom

Vibrant Tom

Vibrant Tom

Vibrant Tom Inactive

Vibrant Tom Inactive

This one I use for my default shell (PowerShell 7).

{
            // Color Scheme: VibrantTom
            "background" : "#16171D",
            "black" : "#878787",
            "blue" : "#44B4CC",
            "brightBlack" : "#E373C8",
            "brightBlue" : "#0000FF",
            "brightCyan" : "#19D1D8",
            "brightGreen" : "#81EC0D",
            "brightPurple" : "#FF00FF",
            "brightRed" : "#FF0000",
            "brightWhite" : "#E5E5E5",
            "brightYellow" : "#FFD93D",
            "cyan" : "#19D1D8",
            "foreground" : "#FFFFFF",
            "green" : "#CCFF04",
            "name" : "VibrantTom",
            "purple" : "#9933CC",
            "red" : "#FF6600",
            "white" : "#F5F5F5",
            "yellow" : "#FFD93D"
        },

Windows PowerShell Tom

Windows PowerShell Tom

Windows PowerShell Tom

Windows PowerShell Tom Inactive

Windows PowerShell Tom Inactive

{
            // Color Scheme: PowerShellTom
            "background" : "#012456",
            "black" : "#000000",
            "blue" : "#0000ff",
            "brightBlack" : "#AAAAAA",
            "brightBlue" : "#44B4CC",
            "brightCyan" : "#19D1D8",
            "brightGreen" : "#81EC0D",
            "brightPurple" : "#FF00FF",
            "brightRed" : "#FF0000",
            "brightWhite" : "#E5E5E5",
            "brightYellow" : "#FFD93D",
            "cyan" : "#19D1D8",
            "foreground" : "#FFFFFF",
            "green" : "#00ff00",
            "name" : "PowerShellTom",
            "purple" : "#9933CC",
            "red" : "#FF6600",
            "white" : "#F5F5F5",
            "yellow" : "#FFD93D"
        },

Retro Command Prompt

Retro Command Prompt

Retro Command Prompt

Dracula

Dracula

Dracula

Dracula Inactive

Dracula Inactive

{
            // Color Scheme: Dracula
            "background" : "#282A36",
            "black" : "#21222C",
            "blue" : "#BD93F9",
            "brightBlack" : "#6272A4",
            "brightBlue" : "#D6ACFF",
            "brightCyan" : "#A4FFFF",
            "brightGreen" : "#69FF94",
            "brightPurple" : "#FF92DF",
            "brightRed" : "#FF6E6E",
            "brightWhite" : "#FFFFFF",
            "brightYellow" : "#FFFFA5",
            "cyan" : "#8BE9FD",
            "foreground" : "#F8F8F2",
            "green" : "#50FA7B",
            "name" : "Dracula",
            "purple" : "#FF79C6",
            "red" : "#FF5555",
            "white" : "#F8F8F2",
            "yellow" : "#F1FA8C"
        },

Ubuntu Legit

UbuntuLegit

UbuntuLegit

UbuntuLegit Inactive

UbuntuLegit Inactive

This one I saw first at Scott Hanselman’s blog. This one I use for my Windows Subsystem for Linux 2 (WSL 2) running Ubuntu.

{
            // Color Scheme: UbuntuLegit
            "background":  "#2C001E",
            "black":  "#4E9A06",
            "blue":  "#3465A4",
            "brightBlack":  "#555753",
            "brightBlue":  "#729FCF",
            "brightCyan":  "#34E2E2",
            "brightGreen":  "#8AE234",
            "brightPurple":  "#AD7FA8",
            "brightRed":  "#EF2929",
            "brightWhite":  "#EEEEEE",
            "brightYellow":  "#FCE94F",
            "cyan":  "#06989A",
            "foreground":  "#EEEEEE",
            "green":  "#300A24",
            "name":  "UbuntuLegit",
            "purple":  "#75507B",
            "red":  "#CC0000",
            "white":  "#D3D7CF",
            "yellow":  "#C4A000"
        },

Vibrant Tom Light

Vibrant Tom Light

Vibrant Tom Light

Vibrant Tom Light Inactive

Vibrant Tom Light Inactive

This one I am still working on. I am not 100 percent happy, so let me know if you have any ideas.

{
            // Color Scheme: VibrantInkTom Light
            "background" : "#EEEEEE",
            "black" : "#878787",
            "blue" : "#44B4CC",
            "brightBlack" : "#595e68",
            "brightBlue" : "#0000FF",
            "brightCyan" : "#19D1D8",
            "brightGreen" : "#3f953a",
            "brightPurple" : "#FF00FF",
            "brightRed" : "#FF0000",
            "brightWhite" : "#E5E5E5",
            "brightYellow" : "#FF6600",
            "cyan" : "#44B4CC",
            "foreground" : "#16171D",
            "green" : "#3f953a",
            "name" : "VibrantTomLight",
            "purple" : "#9933CC",
            "red" : "#FF6600",
            "white" : "#F5F5F5",
            "yellow" : "#FFD93D"
        },

Conclusion

I hope this blog post helps you to customize your Windows Terminal and I hope you like my Windows Terminal color schemes. Let me know in the comments which Windows Terminal Theme you like best.



How to Change the Windows Terminal Default Shell Profile

How to Change the Windows Terminal Default Shell Profile

The Windows Terminal is now generally available as version 1.0. I already shared a blog post on how to customize the Windows Terminal and shared my personal settings.json file with a lot of different examples, like the integration of PowerShell Remoting, SSH Remoting, changing the background image and much more. One question I got is, how to change the Windows Terminal default shell or default profile from PowerShell to the Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL) or the command line (cmd).

By default, the Windows Terminal takes PowerShell 7 (if it is installed) as the primary shell when you open the Windows Terminal. However, if you want to change that you can simply configure the default shell in Windows Terminal, in the settings.json file. On the top, you can find the “defaultProfile” setting with a GUID

{
    "$schema": "https://aka.ms/terminal-profiles-schema",
    "defaultProfile": "{574e775e-4f2a-5b96-ac1e-a2962a402336}",
....
}

The GUID is the GUID of your profile. For example, if you want to change it to cmd, you can use the following GUID “0caa0dad-35be-5f56-a8ff-afceeeaa6101”.

Windows Terminal Default Profile - Default Shell

Windows Terminal settings.json

I hope this blog post gives you a look on how to switch the default shell in Windows Terminal. I recommend that you check out my other blog post where I share even more details on how to customize the Windows Terminal. You can also read the full announcement blog for the version 1.0 here or check out the documentation on Microsoft Docs.

If you have any questions, feel free to leave a comment.



How to SSH into an Azure VM from Windows Terminal Menu

How to SSH into an Azure VM from Windows Terminal Menu

A couple of days ago, I released a blog post on how you can add a PowerShell remote session in the Windows Terminal menu. In my example, I created a menu item in Windows Terminal to use PowerShell remoting to connect to an Azure virtual machine (VM). In the meantime, I got a lot of questions on how you can add an SSH connection to an Azure VM in the Windows Terminal. That is why I am going to share here, how you can add an SSH connection to an Azure VM in the Windows Terminal menu.

Scott Hanselman wrote a great blog post on how you can add tabs to open an SSH connection, so I highly recommend that you read his blog for all the details.



Surface Pro X Windows 10 on ARM WSL 2

How to Install WSL 2 on Windows 10 on ARM

This is just a quick blog post about the experience on running the Windows Subsystem for Linux 2 (WSL 2) on Windows 10 on ARM, which comes on devices like the Surface Pro X. Since I got many questions from developers and IT Pros about the Surface Pro X and how it can handle different workflows on Windows 10 on ARM, I decided to write a blog post, on how you can install WSL 2 on Windows 10 on ARM and the Surface Pro X.

Requirements

You need a device that runs Windows 10 on ARM like the Surface Pro X. Yes, WSL 2 works on the Surface Pro X, and you can run Ubuntu 18.04, which comes as an ARM compiled distro. But you will need to install at Windows Insider build (19041 or higher, also known as Windows 10 20H1 or Windows 10 version 2004). And yes, if you are running an Intel or AMD based machine, you can also install and run WSL 2 on Windows 10.

Install Windows 10 on ARM Windows Insider Build

Install Windows 10 on ARM Windows Insider Build

To run Windows 10 Insider Builds, you can go to Settings, Update & Security, and the Windows Insider Program and join the program. If you get asked to choose the Ring, you will need to select the Insider Slow Ring. You will need to reboot your machine and check for updates, to install the Windows Insider builds.

Install WSL 2 on Windows 10 on ARM

To install the Windows Subsystem for Linux 2 (WSL 2), you need to follow these tasks.

  • Enable the Windows Subsystem for Linux Optional feature (WSL 1 and WSL 2)
  • Install a distro for the Windows Subsystem for Linux
  • Enable the ‘Virtual Machine Platform’ optional feature (WSL 2)
  • Configure the distro to use WSL 2

Enable the Windows Subsystem for Linux and Virtual Machine Platform

Windows 10 on ARM Control Panel WSL2

Windows 10 on ARM Control Panel WSL2

You can enable the Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL) and the Virtual Machine Platform feature in the Control Panel or with PowerShell.

Enable-WindowsOptionalFeature -Online -FeatureName Microsoft-Windows-Subsystem-Linux
 
Enable-WindowsOptionalFeature -Online -FeatureName VirtualMachinePlatform

These commands will need a reboot of the machine.

Install a Linux distro for the Windows Subsystem for Linux

If you don’t already have installed a WSL distro, you can download and install it from the Windows 10 store. You can find more here: Crazy times – You can now run Linux on Windows 10 from the Windows Store.

Install Ubuntu ARM WSL 2 Windows Store on the Surface Pro X

Install Ubuntu ARM WSL 2 Windows Store on the Surface Pro X

If you want to run a full Ubuntu virtual machine on Windows 10 Hyper-V, you can check out my blog post.

Set WSL distro to use version 2

After you completed the first two steps, you will need to configure the distro to use WSL 2. Run the following command to list the available distros in PowerShell:

wsl -l -v

If this command doesn’t work with the -v parameter, you don’t have the right Windows 10 build installed.

To set a distro to WSL 2, you can run the following command:

wsl --set-version DistroName 2
Convert to WSL 2

Convert to WSL 2

You can also set WSL 2 as the default. You can also run the command before you start the Linux distro for the first time, which will give you faster setup speeds.

wsl --set-default-version 2

To find out more about installing WSL 2, check out the Microsoft Docs page.

After you have enabled WSL 2 you can see that WSL 1 was running kernel version 4.4.0.

WSL 1 Kernel Version

WSL 1 Kernel Version

 

WSL 2 is running Linux kernel version 4.19.84

WSL 2 Kernel Version

WSL 2 Kernel Version

You can also see, that this is an ARM version of Ubuntu.

Ubuntu ARM

Ubuntu ARM

Conclusion

I hope this helps you and gives you a quick overview on how you can install WSL 2 on Windows 10 on ARM and the Surface Pro X. If you have any questions, let me know in the comments and check out the WSL 2 FAQ. The Windows Subsystem for Linux 2 Kernel is also open-source, you can follow the project on GitHub.

By the way, you can now also start using Docker Desktop together with the Windows Subsystem for Linux 2 and even use WSL 2 on Windows Server.



Cascadia Code in Windows Terminal

Change the Windows Terminal Theme from Light to Dark

This is again a very small post on the Windows Terminal, like how to open the Windows Terminal from the command prompt or run and how to change the Windows Terminal background image. This time I got asked about how you switch the Windows Terminal Theme from light to dark. Well, the answer is pretty simple. The theme of the Windows Terminal is defined by the Windows 10 color theme. So to change the Windows Terminal theme from light to dark, you simply need to change the default app mode to dark or switch completely switch to dark in the Windows 10 personalization settings. Not like other Windows 10 apps, after you have switch the color mode, you will need to close and reopen the Windows Terminal to see the change.

The Windows Terminal is currently in preview and lets you run shells like the classic command-line, PowerShell or WSL and WSL 2. If you want to know how to install the Windows Terminal or how to customize the Windows Terminal, check out my blog post.

Change to Windows Terminal Dark Theme

Here is how you change it to the dark theme.

  1. Open Windows 10 Settings
  2. Go to Personalization
  3. Click on Colors
  4. Choose your color and select “Dark
Windows Terminal Dark Theme

Windows Terminal Dark Theme

 

Activate Light Theme

Here is how you change it to the light theme.

  1. Open Windows 10 Settings
  2. Go to Personalization
  3. Click on Colors
  4. Choose your color and select “Light
Windows Terminal Light Theme

Windows Terminal Light Theme

You can find more tips on how to customize the Windows Terminal on my blog. I hope this is a quick help, also check out my blog post about the new font called Cascadia Code. If you have any questions, please let me know in the comment.



Windows Subsystem for Linux 2 WSL2 on Windows Server

How to Install WSL 2 on Windows Server

A couple of months ago Microsoft announced the Windows Subsystem for Linux 2 (WSL 2), which is a successor of the Windows Subsystem for Linux shipped a couple of years ago. WSL 2 is currently available for Windows Insiders running Windows 10 Insider Preview Build 18917 or higher and with the Docker Tech Preview, you can now even run Docker Linux Container directly on WSL 2. With the latest Windows Server Insider Preview build 18945, you are also able to run WSL 2 on Windows Server. In this blog post, I am going to show you how you can install the Windows Subsystem for Linux 2 (WSL 2) on Windows Server. The Windows Subsystem for Linux was already available in earlier versions of Windows Server; however, WSL 2 brings a lot of new advantages.

The Windows Subsystem for Linux was in Windows 10 for a while now and allowed you to use different versions of Linux on your Windows 10 machine. With WSL 2, the architecture will change drastically and will bring increased file system performance and full system call compatibility. WSL 2 is now using virtualization technology (based on Hyper-V) and uses a lightweight utility VM on a real Linux kernel. You can find out more about WSL 2 in the release blog or on the Microsoft Docs Page for WSL 2.

Install Windows Subsystem for Linux 2 (WSL 2) on Windows Server

Here is how you can install WSL 2 on Windows Server.

Prerequisites:

After you have installed a new Windows Server with the Windows Server Preview build, you will need to add the following features:

  • Microsoft-Windows-Subsystem-Linux
  • VirtualMachinePlatform

To enable these features, run the following command:

Enable-WindowsOptionalFeature -Online -FeatureName Microsoft-Windows-Subsystem-Linux
 
Enable-WindowsOptionalFeature -Online -FeatureName VirtualMachinePlatform

These commands will need a restart to complete.

Windows Subsystem for Linux 2 WSL2 on Windows Server

Windows Subsystem for Linux 2 (WSL2) on Windows Server

Now you can install your Linux distribution which is available in WSL. You can also find the links to the Linux distro packages here: WSL distro packages. In my case, I am going to use Ubuntu 18.04, which is currently working with WSL 2.

Invoke-WebRequest -Uri https://aka.ms/wsl-ubuntu-1804 -OutFile ~/Ubuntu1804.zip -UseBasicParsing
md C:\Distros\Ubuntu1804
Expand-Archive ~/Ubuntu1804.zip C:\Distros\Ubuntu1804

Before you start and configure your WSL distro, I recommend that you set the WSL default version to 2. This will make the setup of your distro much faster.

wsl --set-default-version 2

Now you can start ubuntu.exe to run WSL.

C:\Distros\Ubuntu1804\ubuntu1804.exe

I hope this gives you a step-by-step guide on how you can install WSL 2 on Windows Server. Remember this is currently in preview, and not for production use. If you want to install the Windows Subsystem for Linux on Windows Server 2019, check out this blog post: Install Windows Subsystem for Linux on Windows Server.



Download the new Windows Terminal Preview

How to open Windows Terminal from Command Prompt or Run

This is a really short blog post and more of a reminder than anything else. You might have seen the new Windows Terminal for Windows 10 was just released in the Windows Store as a preview. However, in the last couple of updates to the Windows Terminal app, it got to a state which already makes it my default terminal. The Windows Terminal allows you to run Windows PowerShell, PowerShell Core and even Bash using the Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL). Especially the integration of the Azure Cloud Shell is a great plus for me. In this blog post, I am just going to show you how you can open the Windows Terminal from command prompt or Run (WIN + R).

To open Windows Terminal from the command line (cmd) or in Windows Run (WIN +R) type:

wt
Open Windows Terminal start wt

Open Windows Terminal start wt

 

If you want to know more about the Azure Cloud Shell integration, read the blog of Pierre Roman (Microsoft Cloud Advocate) on the ITOpsTalk blog.