Tag: Docker

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Azure Kubernetes Service

Azure Kubernetes Service (AKS) – The best place to host your containers

Microsoft today at Build 2018 announced that they will rename Azure Container Service (AKS) to Azure Kubernetes Service (AKS).

Azure Kubernetes Service (AKS) manages your hosted Kubernetes environment, making it quick and easy to deploy and manage containerized applications without container orchestration expertise. It also eliminates the burden of ongoing operations and maintenance by provisioning, upgrading, and scaling resources on demand, without taking your applications offline.

  • Drastically simplifies how you build and run container-based solutions without deep Kubernetes expertise
  • Auto Update, auto scale
  • New capabilities integrated with dev tools and workspaces, CI/CD networking, monitoring tools, etc.
  • All included in the Azure Portal

Create Azure Kubernetes Service AKS

This will be a great services to run containerized workloads in a very simple manor and reduce management overhead.

Azure Kubernetes Service (AKS) will also be available on Azure Stack, as announced in the Azure Stack Roadmap update a couple of months ago.

Azure Kubernetes Service (AKS) on Azure Stack
Managed Kubernetes with Azure Kubernetes Service (AKS) on Azure Stack will make it even easier for Azure Stack users to manage and operate Kubernetes environments in the same ways as they do in Azure, without sacrificing portability. This new service features an Azure-hosted control plane, automated upgrades, self-healing, easy scaling, and a simple user experience for both developers and cluster operators. With Container Service, customers get the benefit of open source Kubernetes without complexity and operational overhead. This update applies primarily to Azure Stack users.

With AKS on Azure and Azure Stack. and other services like the Azure Container Registry, Docker for Windows, Windows Server and Hyper-V Containers, Visual Studio Team Services Integration for Azure and Containers, the Microsoft container story becomes very strong. It allows you to run your container workloads in a very simple CI/CD pipeline (VSTS), deployment on Managed Kubernetes (AKS) and deploy it where ever you need it, in the public cloud (Azure) or on-premise (Azure Stack).

Yes Microsoft still has ACS (Azure Container Service), which allows you to deploy different pre-configured container environments and orchestrators, like Docker Swarm, Kubernetes, DC/OS, for scalable deployments and management of containerized workloads.



Techorama 2018

Speaking about Azure Stack and Hyper-V at Techorama 2018 in Antwerp Belgium

Today I am happy to announce that I am one of the speakers at the Techorama 2018 conference in Antwerp Belgium. Techorama is a yearly international technology conference which takes place at Metropolis Antwerp. Techorama welcomes about 1500 attendees, a healthy mix between developers, IT Professionals, Data Professionals and SharePoint professionals. Their commitment is to create a unique conference experience with quality content and the best speaker line-up. Techorama will take place from the 22nd -24th of May 2018.

I will be speaking in two sessions about Microsoft Azure Stack and Hyper-V

Azure Stack - Your Cloud Your Datacenter

Microsoft released Azure Stack as a Azure appliance for your datacenter. Learn what Azure Stack is, what challenges it solves, how you deploy, manage and operate a Azure Stack in your datacenter. Learn about the features and services you will get by offering Azure Stack to your customers and how you can build a true Hybrid Cloud experience. In this presentation Thomas Maurer (Microsoft MVP) will guide you through the highly anticipated innovations and experience during the Azure Stack Early Adaption Program and Azure Stack Technology Adoption Program (TAP).

10 hidden Hyper-V features you should know about!

In this session Thomas Maurer will talk about 10 hidden Hyper-V features everyone should know about. This covers different features for Hyper-V on Windows Server as well as on Windows 10. Be prepared for a lot of Demos!

Hopefully see you there!



Azure Stack PowerShell Docker Container

Run Azure Stack PowerShell and Azure Stack Tools in a Docker Container

The Azure Stack Tools is a set of scripts and tools to work with Azure Stack and Azure. If you want to run the Azure Stack Tools you will need to install the Azure Stack compatible Azure PowerShell module. To install that that can be some work and it does not allow to run the side by side today with the latest Azure PowerShell Module. For that I have a simple solution. I created two Docker Containers with preinstalled Azure Stack PowerShell and one with Azure Stack PowerShell and the Azure Stack Tools together.

AzureStack-Tools is a GitHub repository that hosts PowerShell modules for managing and deploying resources to Azure Stack. If you are planning to establish VPN connectivity, you can download these PowerShell modules to the Azure Stack Development Kit, or to a Windows-based external client

Azure Stack PowerShell Docker Container

Azure Stack PowerShell Docker Container

This container contains the Azure Stack PowerShell. To run Azure Stack PowerShell in a Docker Container, just run the following command on your server or PC with Docker installed.

Azure Stack Tools Docker Container

Azure Stack Tools Docker Container

This container contains the Azure Stack PowerShell as well as the Azure Stack Tools. To run Azure Stack Tools in a Docker Container, just run the following command on your server or pc with Docker installed.

Both Images are based on Windows Server Core and depending on the microsoft/windowsservercore Docker images.

This should help you to quickly spin up new Azure Stack Operator Workstations. And it should help you to work and interact with Azure Stack.



Azure Cloud Shell

Azure Cloud Shell – shell.azure.com and in Visual Studio Code

Back in May Microsoft made the Azure Cloud Shell available in the Microsoft Azure Portal. Now you can use it even quicker by just go to shell.azure.com. First you login with your Microsoft account or Work and School account, and if your account is in multiple Azure Active Directory tenants, you select the right tenant and you will be automatically logged in. So even if you are on a PC where you can not install the Azure CLI or the Azure PowerShell module, you can still easily fire up a shell where you can run the Azure CLI, Azure PowerShell and other CLI tools like Docker, Kubectl, emacs, vim, nano, git and more.

In addition you can also open up Azure Cloud Shell directly from Visual Studio Code

Azure Cloud Shell Visual Studio Code

With that, enjoy your holidays and I wish you a good start in the new year!



Docker Windows Server Container Images

Docker Container Images for Windows Server 1709 and new tagging

Last week Microsoft announced new Windows Server 1709 and the new Windows Server 1709 container images. The new container images in Windows Server version 1709 are highly optimized, especially in size. So for example the new Nano Server Container Image in 1709 is 5x smaller than the Nano Server Container Image in Windows Server 2016.

Microsoft also made some changes to tagging which is interesting.

If you want to use the latest images of the container images based on the Windows Server 2016 (which is in the Long-Term Servicing Channel, LTSC) you just run:

This will give you the latest images of the Windows Server and Nano server container images. If you want to run a specific patch level of the Windows Server 2016 (LTSC)m images, you can run the following:

Docker Windows Server Container Images Size

If you want to use the new Windows Server 1709 container images from the Semi-Annual Channel you can run the following

and again you cans also add a specific base OS container image by using a KB number:

If you already tried out the new container images during the development using the insider images, they still existing:

However, I am not sure what the plan for the insider images is going forward.



Docker for Windows Update Linux Containers

How to run Docker Linux Container on Windows 10 Fall Creator Update

I just blogged about how to run a Docker Linux Container natively on the new Windows Server version 1709. Docker today released a new update for Docker on Windows which also enables this scenario a little bit easier on your Windows 10 machine. It will ask you if you want to use the new feature to run Linux Containers natively on a Hyper-V Container running on Windows 10 (without the Moby VM).

As you can see the only thing right now you have to turn the feature on and off, since in this technical preview it is not yet possible to run Linux and Windows containers in parallel. But I guess soon that will be the case.

What you need is:

  • Windows 10 Fall Creators Update (Build 16299, Version 1709, RS3)
  • Docker for Windows 17.10.0-ce-win36 (13788) or higher

Enable Linux Containers on Windows

You can change the settings in the Docker Settings:

Docker for Windows Settings Enable Linux contianers on Windows

With hat setting on you can now run Linux Containers such as ubuntu on Windows directly, without having a Linux Virutal Machine running in the background to host the Linux containers.

Docker Run Ubuntu on Windows 10 Verions

Now you can also do some other fancy things like run the Azure CLI in a Linux Container on Windows 10.

Docker Azure CLI on Linux on Windows 10 Container

Simple and effective, and it will be even more powerful when you can run Linux and Windows Container in parallel on Windows Sever and on Windows 10.



How to run Docker Linux Container on Windows Server 1709

As mentioned Microsoft released the final version of Windows Server 1709 in the last week. Windows Server 1709 brings a couple of new improvements, especially in the container space. Microsoft and Docker are working on bringing Linux Container support to Windows Server, so you can now run Windows and Linux Container at the same time on a Windows Server Container Host running Windows Server 1709 or Windows 10 with the Fall Creators Update (1709).

In this post I want to show you how you setup up a Container Host to run Windows and Linux Containers at the same time using Docker.

Create Container Host Virtual Machine

Enable Nested Virtualization

If you run Docker on a physical server you can skip this step. If you want to run Docker Containers using Linux inside a Virtual Machine running on Hyper-V you should enable Nested Virtualization for the Container Host Virtual Machine. You can do this by running the following command:

if you want to do this on a Hyper-V Server in Azure, check out this post: How to setup Nested Virtualization in Microsoft Azure

Install Docker Enterprise Edition Preview on Windows Server 1709

First you have to install Docker Enterprise Edition Preview on your Windows Server 1709 container host. You can install the Docker EE preview using PowerShell package management, using the following commands:

As mentioned this is a preview version of Docker EE which enables a bunch of new features, to run Docker in production environments please use Docker EE 17.06.

Enable Docker Linux Containers on Windows

The preview Docker EE package includes a full LinuxKit system (13MB) for use when running Docker Linux containers. To enable this use the following command:

to disable it again use the following:

Run Linux Docker Container on Windows Server

Docker Ubuntu Container on Windows Server

Now you are able to run Linux Containers on Windows Server 1709.

for fun you can also run Nyancat!

Docker Nyan Cat on Windows Server

Things are still in preview, so don’t expect to work 100% 🙂