Tag: Azure Monitor

How to monitor an Azure virtual machine with Azure Monitor

How to Monitor an Azure virtual machine with Azure Monitor

This week in the Azure tip video, we are going to have a look at how to monitor an Azure virtual machine (VM) with Azure Monitor. You can use Azure Monitor to collect and analyze monitoring data from Azure virtual machines to maintain their health. Virtual machines can be monitored for availability and performance with Azure Monitor like any other Azure resource, but they’re unique from other resources since you also need to monitor the guest operating and system and the workloads that run in it.

To learn more about how to monitor Azure virtual machines (VMs) with Azure Monitor, you can check out the following links:

  • Microsoft Docs: Monitoring Azure virtual machines with Azure Monitor
  • Quickstart: Monitor an Azure virtual machine with Azure Monitor

You can also check out how you can connect Windows Server machines in hybrid environments to Azure Monitor using Windows Admin Center here. If you have any questions, comments, or another great idea for an Azure tip video, feel free to leave a comment below.



Collect data from a Windows computer in a hybrid environment with Azure Monitor

Collect data from a Windows computer in a hybrid environment with Azure Monitor

I quickly want to share some of our new Azure tips videos. In this video, we are going to have a look at how to collect data from a Windows computer in a hybrid environment with Azure Monitor. Azure Monitor can collect data directly from your physical or virtual Windows computers in your environment into a Log Analytics workspace for detailed analysis and correlation. Installing the Log Analytics agent allows Azure Monitor to collect data from a datacenter or other cloud environment. This video shows you how to configure and collect data from your Windows computer with a few easy steps.

You can find more information about how to collect data from a Windows computer in a hybrid environment with Azure Monitor on Microsoft Docs. You can also check out the following the quickstart guide.

If you have any questions or comments, feel free to leave a comment below.



Azure Arc Servers Log Analytics

Azure Log Analytics for Azure Arc Enabled Servers

In this blog post, we are going to have a quick look at how you can access Azure Log Analytics data using Azure Arc for Servers. The Azure Log Analytics agent was developed for management across virtual machines in any cloud, on-premises machines, and those monitored by System Center Operations Manager. The Windows and Linux agents send collected data from different sources to your Log Analytics workspace in Azure Monitor, as well as any unique logs or metrics as defined in a monitoring solution. When you want to access these logs and run queries against these logs, you will need to have access to the Azure Log Analytics workspace. However, in many cases, you don’t want everyone having access to the full workspace. Azure Arc for Servers provides RBAC access to log data collected by the Log Analytics agent, stored in the Log Analytics workspace the machine is registered.

Introducing Azure Arc
For customers who want to simplify complex and distributed environments across on-premises, edge and multicloud, Azure Arc enables deployment of Azure services anywhere and extends Azure management to any infrastructure.
Learn more about Azure Arc here.

How to enable Log Analytics for Azure Arc Enabled Servers

To enable log collection, you will need to install the Microsoft Monitoring Agent (MMA) on your Azure Arc enabled server. You can do this manually for Windows and Linux machines, or you can use the new extension for Azure Arc enabled servers. If you already have the MMA agent installed, you can start using logs in Azure Arc immediately.

Create Microsoft Monitoring Agent - Azure Arc

Create Microsoft Monitoring Agent – Azure Arc

After you have installed the agent, it can take a couple of minutes until the log data shows up in the Azure Log Analytics workspace. After the logs are collected in the workspace, you can access them with Azure Arc.

Azure Arc Servers Log Analytics

Azure Arc Servers Log Analytics

Now you can run queries using the Keyword Query Language (KQL) as you would in the Azure Log Analytics workspace, but limited to the logs for that specific server.

Conclusion

With Azure Arc for Servers, we can use role-based access controls to logs from a specific server running on-prem or at another cloud provider, without having access to all the logs in the log analytics workspace.

You can learn more about how Azure Arc provides you with cloud-native management technologies for your hybrid cloud environment here, and you can find the documentation for Azure Arc enabled servers on Microsoft Docs.

If you have any questions or comments, feel free to leave a comment below.



Azure Arc Enabled Servers Extension Management

Azure Arc Enabled Servers Extension Management

Azure Arc for Server just got a couple of new features. In this blog post, we are going to have a look at the new feature on Azure Arc enabled servers called extension management. This new Azure Arc enabled servers features allows you not only to deploy extensions like the Custom Script Extension, or the Microsoft Monitoring Agent but also enable features like Azure Update Management, Inventory, Change Tracking, and more for your servers running in a hybrid environment.

Introducing Azure Arc
For customers who want to simplify complex and distributed environments across on-premises, edge and multicloud, Azure Arc enables deployment of Azure services anywhere and extends Azure management to any infrastructure.
Learn more about Azure Arc here.

Azure Arc enabled servers already could benefit from several Azure Resource Manager features like Tags, Policies, RBAC, and some Azure Management features like logs and Azure Policy. With the new update, you can start using more extensions.  With these extensions available, Azure Arc enabled servers also get features like Azure Update Management, Inventory, Change Tracking, and insights capabilities.

Azure Arc Azure Management Control Plane

Azure Arc Azure Management Control Plane

Azure Arc Enabled Servers Extension Management Video

You can also watch my summary video on YouTube.



Windows Admin Center Azure Monitor Setup

Connect Windows Server to Azure Monitor

As mentioned in blogs posts before, Windows Admin Center allows admins to extend their on-prem environments with hybrid Azure services. The latest addition is the integration of Azure Monitor in Windows Admin Center. This allows you to connect your Windows Server to Azure Monitor. Azure Monitor collects events and performance counters from Windows Server to run analytics and reporting in Azure and take action when a particular condition is detected. This can then be a notification (SMS, email, push notification) and/or a direct action using Azure Logic Apps, Azure Functions, Azure Automation Runbooks, webhooks or integration into ITSM tools.

Setup monitoring and alerts for Windows Server to Azure Monitor with Windows Admin Center

Windows Admin Center Azure Monitor Setup

Windows Admin Center Azure Monitor Setup

Setting up the Azure Monitor connection in Windows Admin Center is simple. Select the server you want to connect to Azure Monitor. Go to Settings and then Monitoring Alerts.

Connect Windows Server to Azure Monitor

Connect Windows Server to Azure Monitor

Here you will be able to configure the server with the right Azure subscription, resource group and log analytics workspace.



Azure Firewall Setup

This is the Microsoft Azure Firewall

Last week Microsoft announced some cool new and long awaited Azure Network functionalities, which are now in public preview. One of them is the Azure Firewall, which is a fully stateful firewall as a service with built-in high availability and unrestricted cloud scalability. The Azure Firewall is centrally created, enforced, and allows you to log application and network connectivity policies across subscriptions and virtual networks.

This is especially helpful in scenarios where you simply want to block internet traffic or you need centralized management and logging. Obviously, there is still space for third-party firewall appliances with even more functionality, but if you need something easy to configure, without any additional licensing, which you can automatically configure using the existing tooling and has unrestricted scaling capabilities, the Azure Firewall is a great option.

It is also important to notice that the service is still in preview and additional functionality might be added as well as existing functionality might change.

Azure Firewall Spoke and Hub Network

(Image credit: Microsoft)

The Azure Firewall provides you with the following features: