Category: HP

Last updated by at .

Azure Stack Capacity Calculator

Azure Stack Capacity Calculator Tool

One of the most common questions I get when a customer decided to buy Azure Stack is, how you can calculate the sizing of your Azure Stack. He also wants to know how larger the server should be for his workloads and which Azure Stack Hardware SKU he should go for. Microsoft just released the Azure Stack Capacity Calculator (Version 1801.01). This tool will assists customers in the pre-purchase capacity planning of the Azure Stack hardware configuration. This helps you decided on how large your Azure Stack solution should be configured. This sizes server configuration and amount of servers you need to run your workloads on a Azure Stack integrated system. This also helps you in your Azure Stack Pricing Calculation.

The Azure Stack capacity planner is intended to assist in pre-purchase planning to determine appropriate capacity and configuration of Azure Stack hardware solutions.

The Azure Stack capacity planner helps you make informed decisions with respect to planning capacity in two ways: either the by selecting a hardware offering and attempting to fit a combination of resources or by defining the workload that Azure Stack is intended to run to view the available hardware SKUs that can support it. Finally, the spreadsheet is intended as a guide to help in making decisions related to Azure Stack planning and configuration.

The spreadsheet is not intended to serve as a substitute for your own investigation and analysis.  Microsoft makes no representations or warranties, express or implied, with respect to the information provided within the spreadsheet.

Azure Stack Capacity Planner

Azure Stack Resource Calculator

You can download the Azure Stack Capacity Planner from the TechNet Gallery. It is a simple to use Microsoft Excel file, where you enter your workload data. I will out put some information about the configuration you need and even allows you to compare different hardware SKUs. It will also indicate which one will be the best solution for you.

Download Azure Stack Capacity Calculator: TechNet Gallery Azure Stack Capacity Planner (Version 1801.01)


Thomas Maurer Speaking

Speaking at HPE Discover 2017 Madrid

Today I am happy to announce that I have the honor to speak at HPE Discover in Madrid next week. In a presentation together with HP Enterprise I will talk about how HPE and Microsoft improve the Hybrid Cloud experience using Microsoft Azure Stack.

HPE Discover 2017 Madrid Azure Stack

Building your Azure hybrid cloud business is easier when you work with Hewlett Packard Enterprise

With the release of Azure Stack, now is the time to develop your hybrid cloud business. Hewlett Packard Enterprise and Microsoft have partnered to make it easy for you to accelerate your business by offering Azure-consistent services with HPE ProLiant for Microsoft Azure Stack. Come hear about HPE’s solution for Azure Stack and how HPE can help you develop and grow your Azure business. This session is designed for HPE partners.

I hope to see you next week in Madrid, if you have the chance, step by the HIAG Data booth and ask for me.

PowerShell NetAdpater Advanced Property

Hyper-V Network Virtualization NVGRE: No connection between VMs on different Hyper-V Hosts

I have worked on some project with Hyper-V Network Virtualization and NVGRE, and today I have seen an issue with Encapsulated Task Offloading on some HP Broadcom Network adapters.



I have Hyper-V Hosts running with 10GbE Broadcom Network Adapters (HP Ethernet 10Gb 2-port 530FLR-SFP+ Adapter) with driver version (released in 2014). I have created a new VM Network based on Hyper-V Network Virtualization using NVGRE. VM1 is running on Host1 and VM2 is running on Host2. You can ping VM2 from VM1 but there is no other connection possible like SMB, RDP, HTTP or DNS. If you are using a NVGRE Gateway you can no even resolve DNS inside those VMs. If VM1 and VM2 are running on the same Hyper-V host everything between those VMs works fine.

Advanced Driver Settings

If you are using Server Core, which you should by the way, you can use the following command to check for those settings:

PowerShell NetAdpater Advanced Property



The Broadcom Network adapters have a feature called Encapsulated Task Offloading which is enabled by default. If you disable Encapsulated Task Offloading everything works fine. You can disable it by using the following PowerShell cmdlet.

After that connection inside the VMs started to work immediately, no reboot needed.

The State of Cloud Storage in 2013

Mark Russinovich just posted a tweeted with the Infographic for The State of Cloud Storage in 2013 which compares, Microsoft Windows Azure, Google, Amazon, Rackspace and HP.

State of Cloud Storage in 2013


Building a new Hyper-V Private Cloud Lab

Two years ago I created my first real IT Lab with some HP ProLiant ML110 G5. I used this in the past years to test new products and projects. The Lab at this time was very limited, no storage, no cluster, not much RAM and weak CPU performance. Not much help if you work a lot with Hyper-V Clusters and System Center products.

I was looking around for some time now to find a cheap offer for new servers. In the last week I found a offer from Cisco with c200 M2 servers and I couldn’t resist to buy two of the for my Hyper-V Cluster nodes. The offer was a special deal which was even cheaper than building the servers by my own, at this point thanks to my former employer Atlantis Informatik AG.

Now what I will do is creating a new Hyper-V Cluster friendly environment with two Cisco C200 M2 Hyper-V nodes, one HP ML110 G5 as Storage Server and one of my old HP ML110 G5 servers as Hyper-V Server which all my Management servers and Active Directory will run on.

Lab Overview

If you want to know more about Hardware you can use for a Hyper-V Lab I recommend the posts of Carsten Rachfahl on (german).

Hardware Configuration

Hyper-V nodes:

cisco c200 m2

2x Cisco C200 M2 – Intel Xeon 5620 2.4GHz Quad Core, 16GB RAM, Remote Management, IPMI, 6 Networkports

Storage Server:


1x HP ProLiant ML110 G5 – Intel Xeon E3110 3.0 GHz Dual Core, 8GB RAM, 4x 500GB Raid 10, 3 Networkports

Management Hyper-V node:


1x HP ProLiant ML110 G5 – Intel Xeon E3110 3.0 GHz Dual Core, 8GB RAM

HP Microserver N40L Raid Utility and Driver

HP ProLiant MicroServer N40L

Now after setting up my HP Microserver N40L as a Windows Homeserver I had to install the utilities to monitor the Raid and other Hardware. On the HP Support Site you can find a link to the AMD Download page where you can download the Chipset Driver which also includes the Raid Driver and the Raid utility.

Download the AMD Chipset Drivers for the HP Microserver N40L

WHS with HP ProLiant MicroServer N40L

HP ProLiant MicroServer N40L

Two days ago my HP ProLiant MicroServer N40L arrived. Since I need more disk space I was looking for a good NAS solution. My first experiences with some of the common NAS vendors were not that great, most of the time the NAS was very very slow. Now this may has changed in the past years but still I prefer a mini server with a Windows OS.

That is where the HP ProLiant MicroServer and Windows Home Server 2011 meet, so I gave it a try. And guess what, it’s a great solution and it does exactly what I need. It stores files with a good performance, it’s quiet, it does not need a lot of power, let me stream content to my Xbox and enables me remote access to my data.

HP ProLiant MicroServer N40L

  • HP ProLiant MicroServer N40L
  • AMD Turion II NEO N40L 1.5GHz, 15W
  • 2x 2TB WD Caviar Green WD20EARX 5400 rpm, 64 MB Cache, 8,9 ms, SATA3
  • Windows Home Server 2011

Now at the moment I use these two WD 2TB Disks in a RAID 1, and the N40L still offers space for two other drives.