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Tag: Windows

Windows 10 Task View

The best Windows 10 Features – Why you will love Windows 10

Since the first release of the Windows 10 Preview in the Insider program, I was using the Technical previews on my Surface Pro 3, and it is great how Microsoft is improving Windows 10 over the last several months based on research and feedback from the Windows Insider program.

In some days, at July 29, Microsoft will release Windows 10 to the public, and here are some reasons why you will love Windows 10:

Microsoft Edge

Microsoft Edge Browser

With Windows 10 Microsoft released a new browser called Microsoft Edge (before Project Spartan) which is amazing fast and brings a lot of new features to the table such as Cortana Integration, Web notes which allow you basically draw your notes on websites and share them and Microsoft also promised to allow browser extensions. Secret: you can also switch from a Light Theme to a Dark Theme.

Task View & Virtual Desktop

Windows 10 Task View

Most of the IT Pros reading this blog already knew about Task view in previous version of Windows using WIN + TAB, but only a few other users did know about this features. Microsoft not only improved the Task view, Microsoft also promoted it much better  with an icon in the Taskbar.

In Windows 10 WIN + TAB does not only offer you Task View it also allows you to create and switch between Virtual Desktops. With Virtual Desktops you can now finally create multiple workspaces on your PC, which should bring you the productivity boost you need. Secret: You can switch between different Desktops using the Shortcut: CTRL + WIN + ARROW (LEFT and RIGHT).

Hyper-V

Hyper-V vNext Runtime Memory Resize

Microsoft build Hyper-V directly into the Windows Client since Windows 8. This is great if you want to run Virtual Machines on your Windows Client. Windows 10 Client Hyper-V brings you the great performance and features Windows Server 2016 Hyper-V will bring you. Of course some features are only available in the server build of Hyper-V, but you get some great features such as Enhanced Session mode to copy & past between your PC and your Virtual Machine. Secret: Windows 10 will allow you to run Hyper-V and use Connected Standby at the same time.

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Microsoft Remote Desktop Preview App

Microsoft Remote Desktop Preview App for Windows 10

Yesterday Microsoft announced a new Remote Desktop Preview app for Windows 10 Universal Windows Platform (UWP) on the Remote Desktop Services Blog. You can get and download from the Windows Store. The new Remote Desktop Preview app has a connection center to manage your connections to Windows Clients and Windows Server. The connection center is your starting point. It allows you to easily manage your desktops. You can add new desktop connections and edit or delete existing connections. Selecting one of the desktop tiles launches the connection. It’s great to see Microsoft finally creating some great Apps for their own Universal Windows Platform.

Microsoft Remote Desktop Preview App Connection Center



Windows 10 IoT Web Performance

The Windows 10 IoT Core web interface

If you have successfully installed Windows 10 IoT Core on your IoT device, for exmaple the Raspberry Pi 2, you can browse the device using a web interface to get some more information. If you don’t know the IP address or name of your device you can use the Windows 10 IoT Core Watcher to find your device on the network.

One the web interface you have different kind of options:

Networking

Windows 10 IoT Web Networking

Performance Monitoring

Windows 10 IoT Web Performance

Processes

Windows 10 IoT Web processes

Device Manager

Windows 10 IoT Web Device Manager

AppX Manager

Windows 10 IoT Web AppX Manager

 

 



Windows 10 IoT Core on Raspberry Pi

Connect the Adafruit 5″ LCD to the Raspberry Pi 2 running Windows 10 IoT Core

First I had connected my TV as an external display for my Raspberry Pi 2 running Windows 10 IoT Core. Since I need the little device for some demos, and I want to take it with me I got a Adafruit 5″ LCD display to connected to the device.

The setup with the display is very easy and just plug and play. Just connect the display to the Raspberry Pi 2 board.

Raspberry Pi 2 LCD Display

But by default the output of the Raspberry Pi 2 is Full HD and so the display setting is kind of wrong. But you change this by editing the config.txt file from the SD card.

Windows 10 IoT Display Config

Just open the SD card and add the folloing lines to the config.txt file. (Source)

Windows 10 IoT Display Config TXT

Now you get the perfect outputfor the 800×480 display. If you want to change the settings while the SD card is in the device it self, you can use PowerShell. Remote connect to the Raspberry Pi 2 using Powershell and navigate to C:\EFIESP and check out the config.txt

You can now set the content of the config.txt file

To have the changes active you have to restart the Windows 10 IoT Core device

 



Windows 10 IoT PowerShell Cred

How to connect to Windows 10 IoT Core via PowerShell

After you have done the setup of your Raspberry Pi 2 with Windows 10 IoT Core you can now connected to the device via PowerShell.

Connect to the Windows 10 IoT device using PowerShell

First open up PowerShell and configure PowerShell remoting to allow your PC to remotely connect to your Raspberry Pi 2. You can use the name of your Raspberry Pi, which is “minwinpc” by default, or you can also using the IP address. You can also use the Windows 10 IoT Core Watcher which helps you find your devices on the network.

You can now open a new PowerShell Remote session by using the following command:

Windows 10 IoT PowerShell Cred

This will prompt you for credentials. The default password of your Pi is “p@ssw0rd

You can also store the credentials inside a variable, so you do not have to enter it all the time:

Windows 10 IoT PowerShell Remoting minwinpc

To create the connection this can take up to 30 seconds. After that you will see the remote session.

Using PowerShell on your Windows 10 IoT Core device

You can now use PowerShell to do some stuff on your Raspberry Pi with Windows 10 IoT Core. Some PowerShell commands are not build in to Windows 10 IoT Core but you can use some command line utilities.

Get all the process running:

Windows 10 IoT PowerShell Processes

Get network adapter configuration:

List the directories:

Rename your computer:

By renaming your device, you have to reconnect and may change your credentials.

Change the password of your administrator:

Shutdown your device

Windows 10 IoT PowerShell Shutdown

Reboot your device

Close your remote session

I hope this helps you to manage your Windows 10 IoT Core device via PowerShell.



Windows 10 IoT Core Watcher

Find your Windows 10 IoT Core device on the network

If you have done the setup of your Windows 10 IoT Core device you can see the name and the IP address on the default app using a HDMI output. If you don’t have a display connected to your device, Microsoft as a cool tool for you to find your device on the network.

When you download the Windows 10 IoT Core Image you also have a installer file called “WindowsDeveloperProgramForIoT.msi”. This installer installs you a tool called Windows 10 IoT Core Watcher, which will discover your Windows 10 IoT Core devices on the network.

You can also open some options directly from that tool:

Windows 10 IoT Core Watcher Access

This is needed for the next steps in this blog series. If you want to know more about Microsoft and Windows IoT check out my first blog post: Microsoft and the Internet of Things.

 



Windows 10 IoT Core Raspberry Pi2

How to install the Windows 10 IoT Core on the Raspberry Pi 2

Several months ago Microsoft announced that Windows 10 for the Raspberry Pi 2 will be free. In the last weeks I started working on some Internet of Things (IoT) projects, just to figure out how good the Microsoft story is and how simply I can connect devices for example to Microsoft Azure.

First step in the scenario, I bought my self a Raspberry Pi 2 to start with and checked out the Windows IoT dev center for some more information. Now in this blog post I will describe how you can install Windows 10 IoT Core on your Raspberry Pi 2.

First make sure you have the following things ready:

  • A device running the Windows 10 Insider Preview – must be a physical Windows machine (not a VM).
  • Raspberry Pi 2.
  • 5V micro USB power supply – with at least 1.0A current.
  • 8GB micro SD card – class 10 or better.
  • HDMI cable (if you want to use a display).
  • Ethernet cable.
  • Windows 10 IoT Core Insider Preview Image for Raspberry Pi 2” from Microsoft Connect

After you have download Windows 10 IoT Core for Raspberry Pi 2 copy it to a folder for me this was C:\WindowsIoT. Make sure you have the flash.ffu file in it.

Insert the SD card to your device and open PowerShell  and checkout which disks the SD card is running the following PowerShell commands:

Windows 10 IoT PowerShell DISM Applying Image

Now you can see which disk number is your SD card. This is important for the next command. First navigate to the folder where you have stored the flash.ffu file for me this was C:\WindowsIoT. Now you can run the following command to copy the image to your SD card, change \PhysicalDriveN to the Drive with the disk number in my case this would be \PhysicalDrive1:

Now safely remove your SD card from your PC.

Windows 10 IoT Core Raspberry Pi2

You can now insert the SD card to your Raspberry Pi 2 and connect the network cable, screen via HDMI and the USB power adapter to boot the device up. After you have connected the power supply your device will automatically boot up. On the very first boot Windows 10 IoT Core will do some first boot configurations and it will display a blue default application while this is happening. Wait for a few minutes and the board will automatically restart. This will happen only once and then DefaultApp should show up, displaying the IP address of the Raspberry Pi 2.

Windows 10 IoT Core

I will show you how you can connect to your Windows 10 IoT Core device using PowerShell in another post.